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Time Change Challenge

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How are your kids this morning? Did they jump out of bed, ready to leap into learning? Complete all their chores bright and early? Find themselves well-prepared for the day ahead?

Or are they dragging a little bit? Having trouble focusing? Not quite able to settle into their regular routines in spite of the fact that they’ve been on them for months now?

The time change messes with everyone’s head. As a homeschooling parent, you have the ability to change the way your children’s day runs in order to help facilitate a smooth transition—but you can’t wait around all morning for them to realize that it’s time to get up, either.

What is it about the week after a time change that makes kids think they should get up even later than usual? Kids who are normally up by seven may well sleep until nine or later—and they only lost an hour! Something about it just sets their brains out of whack, and it’s not that easy to get them back again.

As their parent, you may be having just as much trouble getting your schedule back to normal—but with some effort, you can get everyone back on the right track.

Shift gradually. Let them sleep a little late the first morning or two—but make it a little earlier every morning until you’re back on schedule.

Have a fun activity prepared. It doesn’t have to be something big—just something to look forward to that will make it a little easier to start the day.

Be up and moving yourself. If you’re still in bed, it’s that much easier for them to roll over and go back to sleep. Be active, a part of whatever is going on throughout the morning, even if you just want to plop down on the couch and stare vaguely around until they get moving this morning.

Issue a wake-up call if necessary. Your kids might normally get themselves up without a problem, but this week, they might need a little bit of extra help. Be prepared to issue it as necessary.

Be a little understanding. Your child may not be hungry at lunch time just yet. He might not be ready to give up a fun activity as quickly. Be patient, and realize that within a week or two, everything will have settled back to normal.

Except the baby. The baby does not understand the concept of “time change,” and will not settle into this new routine that you keep trying to push without a protest.

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