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Three planeswalkers and their possible personality changes

Planeswalkers change. We should expect them to. As dynamic characters in an exciting storyline full of twists and character development, our favorite planeswalkers have undergone sometimes drastic shifts in personality or motive before our eyes. So who's due for a character re-evaluation? Perhaps, in the near future, these guys are:

  • Xenagos plays well with others. Assuming the mad Satyr survived his climactic battle with Elspeth at the end of the Theros block storyline, and that only his God-form got destroyed, he's probably got quite a lot of time to rethink his life choices as he lays twitching in a crater on the ground after having exploded out of Nyx. Maybe some of the pure white mana in Elspeth and her weapon will have rubbed off on him, or maybe he'll come to the (stunning, to him) realization that it's not just he who suffers from the oppression of self-styled deities, but if Xenagos is to move into another color, it's likely white. His hedonistic revels might turn to spirited rallies in favor of sacred revolution all across the multiverse as he becomes the first villainous planeswalker to reform as well as the first red-green-white one.
  • Chandra expands her elementalism. The original red planeswalker, and, arguably, the one most representative of the color, Chandra is big into both fire and poor impulse control. But they've both gotten her into some terrible scrapes, and a chat with Jace or someone similar may lead her to try to rein herself in a little in order to better accomplish her (still impulsive, still short-term) goals. With stopping to think a little comes a propensity to blue magic, and as Robert Frost once wrote, both fire and ice are good at destruction - it's not hard to picture a gleefully blue-red Chandra wielding both heat and cold.
  • Sorin gets fed up. The elder Vampire is twice over the savior of Innistrad. But if the populace of the Gothic-themed plane ever came across him, they'd hate, fear, and try to destroy him. Sorin knows that, and it doesn't seem to bother him too badly - yet. If the whole "being a hero to those who hate your kind" thing finally gets to be too much, or he realizes that the other good-aligned characters can't very well work with someone who uses his "questionable" methods, that white mana might drop from him as he decides to go solo. Of course, Sorin will always be the aloof but protective older brother of the Multiverse, and even that won't make him less of a hero, just more monoblack.