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Three Exhibitions of Modern Art at Cantor Center

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This coming Wednesday, three new exhibitions are coming to the Cantor Center for the Arts at Stanford University.

First up is Pop Art from the Anderson Collection at SFMOMA. The Cantor Center is the latest institution to feature works from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), and this exhibition will feature ten works, in celebrating the opening of the Anderson Collection at Stanford, as well as the family’s generosity and aesthetic vision. Among the featuring artists include Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, and James Rosenquist. Two works expected to be featured in the exhibition are Warhol’s 1967 self-portrait, and Oldenberg’s Funeral Heart (which can be previewed at the Cantor Center’s website at museum.stanford.edu).

Next up is the exhibition The Bay Area and Beyond: Selections from the Museum’s Collection. This is a feature of Cantor’s diverse collection of modern and contemporary art, created by some of the most influential artists of our time. With the Bay Area and Northern California as the theme, the exhibition features work from artists such as Richard Diebenkorn (who once attended Stanford), Nathan Oliveira, and Frank Lobdell. A range of medium will be featured in this exhibition including paintings, sculptures, prints and drawings. The works dates from the 1950s to the present.

Finally there is Well Pressed: Highlights from the Marmor Collection. This exhibition feature thirteen objects in the installation (eleven of which are from the Marmor holdings and two given by others), each displaying a lively and diverse range of American print publications from the late 1960s through the 1980s. Works come from artists including Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Richard Serra and Frank Stella.

Pop Art from the Anderson Collection at SFMOMA, and The Bay Area and Beyond are on view until October 26th. Well Pressed is on view until February 2nd. Log on to museum.stanford.edu for more information.

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