Skip to main content
  1. Life
  2. Education & Schools
  3. Education Policies

Thinking about summer? Resources to help develop job skills in youths with autism

Thinking about this summer yet? Reference Points has assembled a few resources to help youth, families, and educators think about and plan for summertime activities that can help youth develop job skills, including--but not limited to--paid employment.

SUMMERTIME TRANSITION ACTIVITIES
A PDF version of a March 15, 2010 PowerPoint presentation by Ellen Condon and Kim Brown is available on the University of Montana Rural Institute web site.
 

FIND A SUMMER JOB AT A SUMMER CAMP: COUNSELOR & OTHER STAFF POSITIONS


WILDERNESS INQUIRY, OUTDOOR ADVENTURES FOR TEENS OF ALL ABILITIES

WI's Adventure Leadership Program (ALP) is an outdoor-based program that includes youth of all abilities and backgrounds as peers. ALP combines fun and exciting outdoor adventures with opportunities to learn new skills, make new friends, and create life-changing experiences for teens from 13 to 18 years old. Registration is open for events that start as early as June 2010. Fees vary depending on location and length of trip.

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT AND THE VALUE OF WORK-BASED LEARNING
A TATRA project article on the PACER Center web site.


SUMMER EMPLOYMENT AND COMMUNITY EXPERIENCES OF TRANSITION-AGE YOUTH WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES
A scholarly article published in the Winter 2010 edition of the Exceptional Children examining the summer employment and community participation experiences and outcomes of 136 youth with severe disabilities, age 13-21. The authors note that summer months may be a good time for youth with severe disabilities to gain work-related experiences. One of few studies to address the summer experiences of youth with disabilities, it identifies positive predictors of summer employment outcomes. The odds for having a paid job, for example were 15.25 times larger when teachers expected students to work. It is also interesting that the study found that youth who were employed during the summer actually participated in a greater number of different activities compared to youth who were not employed. The many findings of the study highlight the importance of identifying appropriate avenues through which the planning, preparation, and support needs of youth in relation to summer employment c
an be intentionally and meaningfully addressed.

PREPARING FOR EMPLOYMENT: ON THE HOME FRONT
A 2006 Parent Brief prepared by PACER Center for the National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET). It describes ways in which youth and families can help youth effectively explore work-based learning outside of school settings.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

REFERENCE POINTS is administered by PACER Center as a technical assistance activity of the TATRA Project. The TATRA Project is funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration.

Reference Points received initial support from the National Center on Secondary Education and Transition.  Visit their web site for information related to secondary education and transition for youth with disabilities.

 

Comments

Advertisement