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The Widowhood Effect strips down to the acoustics on the Las Vegas Strip

The Widowhood Effect strips down to the acoustics on the Las Vegas Strip.
The Widowhood Effect strips down to the acoustics on the Las Vegas Strip.
Benjamin Stobber

LAS VEGAS, Nev.—The Widowhood Effect busked on the Las Vegas Strip, on July 18. They performed in front of the Bellagio and The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas.

The Widowhood Effect strips down to the acoustics on the Las Vegas Strip.
Benjamin Stobber

Russell Basques is the banjoist, Brandon Benoit plays the foot tambourine and guitar and James Curtis provides vocals and plays guitar for The Widowhood Effect.

After arriving to the front of The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, The Widowhood Effect began their performance with “Dead Queen”. As those passersby stood and listened briefly, they put dollar bills into Benoit’s guitar case. After they nodded and thanked them, they handed them matches which included information as to where to find them on the Internet.

“Web Of Lies” soon followed and Benoit began the song’s introduction. He was soon accompanied by Basques and Curtis did not play his guitar, instead he provided vocals. As he did so, an elderly spectator pushed another on a mobile cart and watched them perform the song.

As the busking tips were adding up and capos were placed on the fret of Curtis and Benoit’s guitars, a photographer took several photographs from various vantage points. After “Stoker” came to an end, he asked which genre of music they considered their style as. Curtis took it upon himself to answer and joked how they called it “Newgrass”. Afterwards, he said they were an acoustic rock and folk band.

Sticking to the busking list of songs, The Widowhood Effect returned to play “Web Of Lies” to grab the attention of different pedestrians. Benoit began to play the guitar; soon he added his foot tambourine and Basques played the banjo. Curtis showcased his various ranges, as he was bringing in the chorus. Afterwards—they made a group decision, decided to choose a different location, counted the money they made and headed down to the Bellagio.

Upon searching for a place to play, they settled between trees as The Widowhood Effect waited for the water show to end. After Fred Ebb and John Kander’s “All That Jazz” and the water show came to an end, they set up their instruments and began “One Last Cigarette” and transitioned into “The Banjo Song”. After the songs came to an end, they spoke amongst themselves. After the traffic and the music from the Bellagio became too loud, they headed back to The Cosmopolitan.

“Her Noise” and “The Banjo Song” were also part of The Widowhood Effect’s set.