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The week ahead: Leonora Carrington at Wendi Norris and more

"Hunting Scene," a tapestry full of imagery from Celtic and ancient mythology. "I didn't have time to be anyone's muse... I was too busy rebelling against my family and learning to be an artist." --Leonora Carrington, 1983
"Hunting Scene," a tapestry full of imagery from Celtic and ancient mythology. "I didn't have time to be anyone's muse... I was too busy rebelling against my family and learning to be an artist." --Leonora Carrington, 1983@Gallery Wendi Norris

Gallery Wendi Norris: Leonora Carrington and "The Celtic Surrealist, "a traveling subset of works from the critically acclaimed 2013 exhibition at the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin." In the gallery’s second solo show for Carrington (English, 1917-2011), and the first since Carrington’s death in 2011, "The Celtic Surrealist" comprises paintings, gouaches, and rarely exhibited tapestries from 1948- 1974. Carrington’s otherworldly narrative paintings comprised of hybrid creatures, twisted mythological narratives, and politically charged and humorous fairytales are further understood by revisiting her version of Irish folk tales interwoven with inspirations from surrealism and European mythology.

Romare Bearden, Storyteller at Jenkins Johnson
Romare Bearden, Storyteller at Jenkins Johnson@Jenkins Johnson

“She was a seeker and a searcher,” said Whitney Chadwick, a professor of art at San Francisco State University and the author of “Women Artists and the Surrealist Movement”(1991). “In her work, she always sought to define moments when one plane of consciousness blends with another.”

Obit from the NY Times

Gallery 16 presents the work of Rex Ray. This exhibition is the first show of the artist's work in California in nearly four years.

Drawing inspiration from his influences—the Arts and Crafts Movement, organic and hard-edged abstraction, pattern and textile design, Ray playfully combines these formalist concepts in his pursuit to create beautiful things.

At Jenkins Johnson: Romare Bearden: Storyteller features collages, watercolors, and prints from the 1970s and 1980s by Romare Bearden, a descendant of the Harlem Renaissance, a great storyteller, and a master colorist.

""Bearden believed that "an intense, eager devotion to present day life, to study it, to help relieve it" was "the calling of the Negro artist." His technique is to show how an explicit, external world reveals as well an evocative internal world of the imagination." (http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/most/hd_most.htm)

Opening April 24 at Creativity Explored. "Elemental Renditions." Three artists at Creativity Explored, blending their diverse cultural backgrounds and in collaboration with one of their Visual Arts Instructors, have created an atavistic, magical, and primal “back to the Garden” statement.

“The artworks are a beautiful expression of the artists’ respective roots in family, community and the natural world,” says Creativity Explored Visual Arts Instructor and curator Pilar Olabarria.