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The ‘void’ in Jeremy Abbott’s career

Jeremy Abbott of USA reacts after the Men's Short Program during ISU World Figure Skating Championships at Saitama Super Arena on March 26, 2014 in Saitama, Japan.
Jeremy Abbott of USA reacts after the Men's Short Program during ISU World Figure Skating Championships at Saitama Super Arena on March 26, 2014 in Saitama, Japan.
Photo by Atsushi Tomura/Getty Images

Four-time national champion and two-time Olympian, Jeremy Abbott, had announced that he would be retiring after the 2013-2014 season, but shortly after the World Championships rumors began circulating that he might not be ready to make his final exit.

“I’ve never had a season where I have had so few mistakes in so many competitions,” Jeremy said on the final night of the Stars on Ice tour. “For me that was very important and I think if I can continue to have minimal mistakes that my scores will only go up.”

Abbott placed fifth at the 2014 World Championships, which is the highest placement of a U.S. man in five years. He won a bronze medal at the 2014 Olympic Games in the team event and Jeremy had one of the best seasons he has had in a long time. He learned so much that he is eager to use what he has learned to see if he can continue to progress.

“The only reason I would want to continue is personal goals. It’s not because I have to, it’s not because I have something to prove,” Jeremy explained. “It’s because I feel that I am missing one thing in my competitive career that I want. I want a world medal. I feel like there is such a void.”

It is odd to look back at the past nine years of Jeremy Abbott’s senior career and not see a world medal, but he has struggled with achieving the success he has had on U.S. ice on the world stage for various reasons.

After a 20-city Stars on Ice tour, where Jeremy has only been home three days in the past two months, Abbott plans on taking some much needed time off, along with a vacation. He then plans to work with with a choreographer to design a free skate that could either work for ice shows or in a competition.

“I plan to train that [long program] throughout the summer and if I’m improving, if I can get another quad, if I’m consistent and if my body feels stronger than I was even last season then you know, I think I will go for it,” Abbott said. “If I’ve made good improvement and things are looking good, then why not? But if things are just too hard, if I can’t keep up anymore or if I’m kind of backsliding than it’s not worth it for me to do it anymore and I can really put my effort into show skating, because I love to perform more than anything.”

Jeremy only wants to compete this season if he realistically believes he can achieve his desire of winning a world medal, if he does not feel that is obtainable after training this summer he will retire. Even if Abbott does retire without a world medal, he will do so after winning a lot of personal victories and inspiring many people. Regardless of retirement he will not be leaving the ice any time soon.

“I’m going to be in the sport for a very long time,” Jeremy expressed. “ I’d like to choreograph and I want to continue to perform. I have such a passion for this sport and I love it so much.”