Skip to main content

See also:

The Urban Rock Legend: Eddie & The Cruisers

Do you know me I'm the drivin' rain. And my mama was a hurricane. Dear old daddy before he stormed out high on window pane. ~ Recorded by Drivin' Rain (Permission of Govt. Mule)

Just as the once disappearance of Eddie perplexes everyone. The mystery behind the one Cruiser, the whole film hints as a dark side happening.  In fact, the film opens with members of the band sitting around on a dock of his same return.
Hair Bangers Radio

A lot like holding a skull while quoting Shakespeare, the ideology of the urban legend theory of musical and other performers who disappear during or at the height of a promising career, some such as Elvis often get claimed as sighted or still alive living quiet, personal lives elsewhere. A well known suspicion regarding actual stars, the film Eddie & The Cruisers, based on the book by P.F. Kluge, the same author also had another book made into a film. Dog Day Afternoon. Martin Davidson directed this 1983 film, and Arlene Davidson helped write the screenplay along with the director. Even though the film, a fall release, and about around the year of 1962, the story of a band looks at the fun of wild summer nights, and a auto top down later, the fame of a greaser cusp border band takes off. The story also about the truth of some of the annoyances and things that happen to usurp focus from the goal to reality the exposure, a journalist named Maggie Foley (Ellen Barken) decides to get an angle on the slotted investigative reporting story. Of course, the once disappearance of Eddie perplexes everyone. The mystery behind the one Cruiser, the whole film hints as a dark side happening. In fact, the film opens with members of the band sitting around on a dock, a presentation clue to the first mystery the news team must uncover. "He got something called words and music," claims one of the band members.

"On the darkside," sung by the Eddie Wilson of the film. And the words to the song may provide a second clue to the mystery of why he left the band, his car gone over and dunked way down below deep water, his body never found. Not so much the fame at hand, as much as a song like Teen Angel relates to the late 1950's style, but for the sake of the actual screen script, 1960's rock and roll, do-wap band, a singer named Regina, and his girl with the band, and a few moments later, the bass player of the original film-fictitious Eddie shows up . A dressing room that turns to conversation about missing tapes, the urban legend behind an Eddie who the band years later begin to suspect may still live incognito elsewhere. The only thing anyone ever really knows at first is that someone of some unknown name checked out the tapes of his last post-recorded songs. The album named A Season In Hell, makes a debut years later, based on the story of a boy who wrote a great literary work, and at the age of eighteen, disappeared and did not turn up until years later on his death bed.