Skip to main content
Report this ad

The unwanted horse: Part 2

Billy, a young Paint horse, an owner surrender. Billy's vertabrae and ribs are clearly visible.
Billy, a young Paint horse, an owner surrender. Billy's vertabrae and ribs are clearly visible.
Susan Hinz

Comments

  • carol 5 years ago

    Yes, it is truly a tragedy when owners leave the animal behind. I suspect there are instances of neglect that the average person isn't aware of. When faced with very difficult financial decisions I'm sure it can be an effort to do the right thing and find appropriate care for the large animal. Horse haven is a great resource - are there other options in Michigan? The last two sentences in the article state it loud and clear - doing nothing or ignoring the problem is not a viable option.

  • Shawna 4 years ago

    Thank you for writing an article that brings to light that simply loving horses does not make you a horse rescue. I have worked for large animal vets and all too often find that there are an abundance of people taking in horses and calling themselves rescues who are truly doing these horses a disservice. It is disheartening to go to a "horse rescue" to find horses who've been there for a year and look like they need to be rescued. One is well adviced to follow the tips in the article to find a reputable and safe rescue when you become unable to meet an equine's basic needs.

Report this ad