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The unsung heroes called cross-posters

Thousands of animals are saved ever month because skilled people called cross-posters click the share button on their computers.
Thousands of animals are saved ever month because skilled people called cross-posters click the share button on their computers.
Penny Tilton

Many people might not have heard of a cross-poster. They are dedicated people on social network sites that work tirelessly day and night to help animals in need. They are not a rescue, or affiliated with any organization most of the time; they are everyday people like you and me that will share a picture or a story of an animal that is in trouble and continue to share that picture or story until that animal is safe. They do not get paid for their life saving skills, nor do they ask for any donations. They are the unsung heroes of the animal advocate community.

Social network sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+, are the platforms the cross-posters will use to network the animals. These social sites have become powerful tools that allow the animals in need their 15-minutes of fame. In a matter of minutes, and with the help from the cross-posters, the story of an animal that is in trouble will spread across the internet like magic.

Social pages like ‘Paulie Wally Cares’ was started by cross-poster Michael Horn to showcase animals in high-kill shelters that need to find a rescue or a home. Then there are pages like ‘Two bartenders helping the kitties’, which was created by cross-poster Debi Ferris to help the stray cats in her community find a home. There are more pages being created everyday like ‘Share and Crosspost for the Animals’ which was recently started by cross-poster Lisa Sullivan that showcases any animal that needs help from lost dogs to animal petitions that need signed. Horn, Ferris, and Sullivan, are just three cross-posters among hundreds, which will find an animal in trouble and continue to post that animal on social pages, groups, and even to their personal accounts until that animal is safe.

It is truly amazing to witness a cross-poster at work sharing an animal. A picture of an animal that might not have been seen without their help will suddenly explode with views, shares, and comments, because they volunteered their time to save a life.

This article is dedicated to all the wonderful cross-posters out there that save lives every day. They do this from their heart, and they make this world a better place. Thank you!