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The Un-Obama? British leader Cameron 'on the warpath' over ISIS

In what some are calling the "opposite of Obama reaction," Great Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron was on the warpath on Monday when he revealed his direct and unflinching strategy to combat what he termed the “scourge of extremism,” as a result of actions taken by the powerful and ruthless Islamic State, a group that originally called itself al-Qaida in Iraq (AQII).

David Cameron was hailed and saluted by Americans who found his reaction to the execution of a young American by an Islamist genuine and heartfelt.
Parliament Press Office

Cameron went before House of Commons and forcefully requested that the Members of Parliament (MPs) authorize the imposition of the anti-terrorism measures he had proposed late last week when he reacted to the brutal execution of an American journalist, James Foley, by a member of the Islamic State suspected of being a British subject.

"Cameron displayed true leadership when he cut short his vacation and immediately responded to the death of a young journalist at the hands of a monster. In contrast, President [Barack] Obama gave the press a statement and then zoomed back to the golf course," said former intelligence officer and police detective Mike Snopes.

Prime Minister Cameron's proposals included giving security officials the authorization to seize the passports of suspected British jihadists leaving the country. It also calls for limiting their ability to move around within the country police or intelligence agency surveillance, according to Det. Snopes.

“As I’ve said all along, this is not a knee-jerk response or sweeping, blanket changes that would be ineffective,” Cameron told the MPs. “It’s not about just new powers, but about how we tackle extremism in all forms. … We will in the end defeat this extremism.”

Besides Islamic State terrorism, Cameron spoke to the MPs about the Russian invasion in Ukraine -- which the Obama administration euphemistically calls and "incursion" -- and the countinued battle Israel is waging against Muslim extremists in the Gaza Strip.

While civil rights groups complain about the Prime Minister's proposals, most British legislators appear to agree that police officers should be given at least temporary power to seize passports at the U.K. borders. Cameron also pointed out that Britain must work to keep out foreign fighters who return from the Middle East and pose a threat to the British people.

Cameron said that Britain's internal security (MI5) and police forces must prevent those suspected of extremism from traveling out of the country and those who have already left must not be allowed to return unless they're in handcuffs and on their way to a detention cell.

According to Cameron, 500 homegrown Islamists have left the U.K. to join the jihad in Iraq and Syria, while 700 have left France and 400 left Germany to join the Muslim extremists. It's been estimated that between 500 and 1,000 U.S. homegrown jihadists may also be part of the ISIS jihad.

His additional proposals include demanding that commercial airlines submit passenger flight lists, or they won't be permitted to land in Britain and the airlines must exclude British nationals from returning to Britain from Muslim nations in the midst of combating terrorist organizations.