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The tide in conservatism

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Not the climate change tide, that one is not apparent. If you try to measure "climate change" by taking a ruler to the beach you won't see anything. Some reports say the ocean level is rising by one tenth inch per year, however that will not show up on your ruler in a year or ten or twenty years. There's too much wiggle. Some beaches are eroding from brutal wave action in specific areas, carrying them away, however the adjacent land not washed away is at the same height above sea level as before, except perhaps the tenth inch already noted, and just as dry as ever.
The tide in conservatism is likewise difficult measure. There is definitely some churning. That was clear in the ouster of Eric Cantor.
What makes it difficult to measure though is the disarray. There are apparently opposing forces claiming to be "conservative" and there is no clear leader yet. Asked to guess who will run for president from the Democratic Party some might name three most likely ones in order. That is not true of the Republican Party.
The Republican Party has troubles with organization. Conservatives have trouble with organization. The troubles are likely caused by the notion that there are three different and distinct types of conservatism; fiscal, national and social conservatism.
The notion is a fairly recent development. In the past, the assumption that a social conservatism with good morals would carry the other two was not challenged. Why would a moral people need a large defense budget? Why would a moral people need to spend much on any government program?
So called "social" conservatism was the whole thing. What happened lately is the "logic" that social conservatism somehow cost more money than social liberalism or social "libertarians" whatever they are. Of course there are no numbers to support such "logic" somewhat like there are no numbers to support many rampant notions. Yet they continue.
There you have it. The disarray in conservatism and in the Republican Party is the result of troublesome numbers and logic. Will a leader ever emerge?
Whatever your opinion of the sea level, the evidence does appear lately to challenge the former picture of the United States as a country of "unlimited" resources. Limits are beginning to show. Perhaps as alarming as the fact that oil was spilled in the Caribbean is the fact that anyone has to go to the middle of it to get oil. More use of renewable energy might be necessary whether the sea level rises or not.
What is the solution to a world of want; fiscal, national or social conservatism? How is that solution different from old ones?
Is a world in grave need more or less likely to recognize private property?
Which course is the "right" course? Which would most effectively mitigate the want?
Is a strong military the answer to everything now? Was it before? Is it especially moral? Are there cracks in the armor? How are those repaired?
What is the solution to the health care news? Will spending $140 per month on something you'll never use and wouldn't help much if you did use it save the struggling economy somehow?
What is the solution to the immigration news? Is a strong military the answer there?
There is definitely a churning in conservatism. The tide remains a difficult thing to measure. The gains made in 2014 might be difficult to distinguish from the gains often made by the party not holding the presidency.

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