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The private-sector will save American jobs, not the government

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By now it is apparent to all Americans that President Obama believes that government plays a vital role in creating good jobs in America. The other side of this argument is good jobs are created by lower taxes and regulations eased.

The facts bode well for the president’s side of the coin. U.S. corporations are increasingly global and have less and less stake in America. According to the Chamber of Commerce, global corporations added 2.4 million jobs abroad in the first decade of the 21st Century while cutting American jobs by 2.`9 million.

American companies are proficient at creating high tech jobs abroad. Apple is the number one culprit in this practice. The National Science Board warns that if the U.S. does not act quickly to change this trend, China’s share of the R and D will top the America.

China is pouring billions into world-class research centers designed to lure American companies. It has the biggest consumer base of any country in the world and they welcome American assistance to lift them out of abject poverty.

Like so many other companies, General Electric has been creating far more jobs outside this country. A decade ago, less than half of GE’s workforce was non-American. Now it’s 54 percent. GE is also shifting more of their research to Communist China, our chief trading rival.

Is this something “un-American?” No, its call a capitalistic country seeking the largest profit they can for their stockholders.

Not surprisingly the National Science Board advocates lower corporate taxes (the highest within industrialized nations) and fewer regulations. The board has also asked for repeal of the anti-corporate-looting provisions enacted by Congress in 2002 in response to Enron, arguing they impede growth and hiring.

Yet lower taxes and fewer regulations will not bring good jobs to America. They might lower the costs of production here, but global companies can always find even lower costs somewhere else around the world.

The key is global corporations, wherever they are based, will create good jobs for Americans only if Americans are productive enough to summon them. A large portion of our population is not equipped to be productive.

The U.S. is crippled by deteriorating schools, unaffordable college tuitions, decaying infrastructure, worsening health (along with rising health care costs) and declining basic R and D. This all creates lousier jobs and lower wages.

Who in Washington is lobbying for a national strategy to create more and better jobs here? Who is attempting to shift the country’s attention from “soaking the rick” and redistribution of wealth by progressive ideologists and getting serious about saving this country’s industrial might that will fix those problems with success?

It has become obvious over the last few decades that the government cannot solve this urgent national emergency. The private-sector must become more involved in the government process and be given the incentive to come back to America and save their own.

Something the Obama administration won’t do and has no interest in doing.

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