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The politics of blame

The state of politics these days in America has been subject to a.lot of political analysis. It is also possible to examine it in terms of psychology, that is, motivation and agenda. In that way, we can get a glimpse into what may compel our leaders to act how they do.

A case can be made that many people will ignore facts that conflict with their agenda. This is important because in order to be elected, a candidate must appeal to their constituents more than their opponent. Therefore, the constituents must see that either the particular candidate not only has better qualifications, but the opponent has qualities that would impede progress.

The case here is that in the process to get elwcted, facts are often twisted, ignored, or put in such a way as to discredit them and further the candidates cause.

Take, for example, the popularity of the President. A recent poll out his approval rating at 42%, which has been holing steady (http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2014/07/23/cnn-poll-obamas-numbers-...).

The opposing party, which has a majority in the House of Representatives, has made moves to both sue him over implementation of the Affordable Care Act, a law that they have tried to repeal (http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5618749).

Interestingly enough, while many Americans have a poor opinion of the health care law, many Americans like it and have signed up for it (http://m.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/current_events/hea...).

The House has also discussed impeaching the President for overreaching in his authority by trying to enact laws without the due process of Congress, which is the legislative branch of government (http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/07/25/white-house-republicans-may-p...)

Yet according to snooes.com citing The American Presidency Project, the current President has actually issued less executive orders than many of his predecessors (http://www.snopes.com/politics/obama/executiveorders.asp).

While many legislators in Congress push these events, they seem to be unconcerned with their own approval ratings. A recent Gallup poll put Congress' approval at only 15% (http://www.gallup.com/poll/1600/congress-public.aspx). This is one-third the approval of the President.

Additionally, Congress has a multitude of bills needing voting (http://www.defenseone.com/politics/2014/06/28-days-left-what-can-congres...) and they were in session less than 129 days over the last two years (http://www.politicususa.com/2014/01/06/congress-2014-scheduling-97-work-...).

It would seem as if Congress is focusing its efforts more in discrediting the President than accomplishing its own agenda.

Certainly this is a very cynical point of view. Unfortunately, it is part if human nature to focus on the failings of others rather than work on our own tasks.

Blame dulls empathy and allows a person to act in a hurtful way. Blame also allows a person to act ion a selfish way and rationalize getting what they want. (http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/blameBadBehavior.htm).

Blame also will reduce out own fears and anxieties by placing them on others (http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/1382729).

But what blame really does is get a person off the hook to perform. Blame allows us to not have to extend ourselves, put forth effort or work. This way, we don't have to face any criticism for failing, if that's what happens.

A more enlightened scenario is that we form a solution toba problem that doesn't work. We go back to the drawing board and figure out another, different solution. We keep at it until the correct solution works. Many people may recognize this process as The Scientific Method (http://teacher.nsrl.rochester.edu/phy_labs/appendixe/appendixe.html).

Perhaps Congress can abandon its blaming culture in favor of the problem-solving method. If not, Election Day is a few months away.