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The key to Torah study; the Rosetta stone of learning

Serenity on the sea in the air above and below
Serenity on the sea in the air above and below
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The manifestation of what is coming to be has always been the magnum opus of spiritual thought. It is the gem of connection that unites together the idea of holiness, the all powerful higher being with the finite appearances that reflect that holiness into our everyday lives.

Rising glory
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This unity of being and the demonstration of that being is the centerpiece of higher spiritual thought and is the lesson that is being taught over and over again throughout Torah and its associated commentaries in Zohar, Bahir, Tikkunei Zohar and a host of other works excluding Mishnah and Gemara since these are practical expositions not meant necessarily for the advancement of higher thought.

When we study Torah the first question that may be asked is why? What is it we are looking for? The answers to these questions are many and are the same that have been pondered throughout the years. Rashi answers them trying to explain in as straightforward manner as possible the deeper meanings, however, his interpretations only scratch the surface and do not get to the underlying substance.

In order to reach deeply into the text of Torah you need to have a guide to go by; a kind of Rosetta stone that will lead you deeper without losing you in the process. This Rosetta stone is as hinted above is our connection with holiness. The main question we must ask is how does what I am studying unite together the experience of holiness with the connection that I am personally making with holiness?

Now we have a place to begin every inquiry and an endpoint to that inquiry.

For example lets use the following verse from Isaiah 32:2 “And a man shall be as in a hiding-place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest; as by the watercourses in a dry place, as in the shadow of a great rock in a weary land.”

Isaiah is particular about speaking of the unity of all things. What the prophet is saying here is that a man that attends to God is safe from the tempest. The tempest represents those thoughts that bring us down. It is negativity. The watercourses are the flow of spirit that courses through us. There is unity above and below and we are in its grasp if only we attend to it.

The elements that always arise are the unity and the connection. How we make sense of these two aspects will always bring out a higher awareness in our Torah studies.
B”H