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The Egyptian Myths: A Guide to the Ancient Gods and Legends uncovers it all

The Egyptian sun god Ra traveled across the sky during the day and through the underworld at night. This tomb painting of the 1200s  B.C. shows Ra with a sun disk on his head.
The Egyptian sun god Ra traveled across the sky during the day and through the underworld at night. This tomb painting of the 1200s B.C. shows Ra with a sun disk on his head.
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King Tut trivia?
Tsk, tsk. The Egyptian Myths: A Guide to the Ancient Gods and Legends (Thames & Hudson, $24.95) is so much more.
As in . . .
How did the ancient Egyptians imagine the creation of the world? How did they explain the sun’s movements and its disappearance at night? In what ways did mythology permeate their lives? And what did they believe happened in
the afterlife?
The Egyptian Myths explores how the ancient Nile-dwellers explained the world around them. This handy guide to Egyptian mythology delves into the creation and evolution of the world and the reigns of the gods on earth, before introducing readers to the manifestations of Egypt’s deities in the natural environment; the inventive ways in which the Egyptians dealt with the invisible forces all around hem; and their beliefs about life after death.
Through his engaging and enjoyable narrative, Garry J. Shaw guides us through the mythic adventures of such famous deities as Osiris, the god murdered by his jealous brother Seth; the magical and sometimes devious Isis, who plotted to gain the power of the sun god Re; and Horus, who defeated his uncle Seth to become king of Egypt; and many more. From stars and heavenly bodies sailing on boats, to the wind as manifestation of the god Shu, to gods, goddesses, ghosts and demons—beings that could be aggressive, helpful, wise, or dangerous—Shaw goes on to explain how the Egyptians encountered the mythological in their everyday lives.