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The Cleveland Museum of Art presents Tokyo National Museum’s ‘Modern Art of Japa

Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum opens on February 16

Portrait of Reiko, 1921. Kishida Ryūsei (1891–1929). Oil on canvas; 48.25 x 55.88 cm. Tokyo National Museum, A-10568. Important Cultural Property.
Cleveland Museum of Art
Comprehensive collection of modern Japanese artworks rarely seen outside of Japan
The Cleveland Museum of Art

Comprehensive collection of modern Japanese artworks rarely seen outside of Japan

On February 16, 2014 The Cleveland Museum of Art will be opening the exhibit “Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum”. The exhibit will feature fifty-five extraordinary works of modern Japanese art dated from the late nineteenth to the twentieth century. The show will include six pieces that the Japanese Government have designated ‘Important Cultural Properties’.

The multi-media exhibit comes from the extensive collection of the Tokyo National Museum and includes examples of painting, sculpture, tapestry, ceramics and calligraphy. This is the first time for an exhibit of this size to be seen outside of Japan. The exhibit will be on display from February 16 through May 11, 2014 and will be housed in the Kelvin and Eleanor Smith Foundation Exhibition Hall.

“Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum” is part of a cultural exchange between the two museums. The Cleveland exhibit “Admired from Afar: Masterworks of Japanese Painting” features highlights of the Cleveland’s Museum’s extensive Japanese art collection as well as pieces from the Korean, Chinese and European collections. The Cleveland exhibit will be on display at the Kyushu National Museum from July 8 to August 31, 2014.

“Thanks to our long-term friendship and partnership with the Tokyo National Museum, it is our privilege to bring this important exhibition of art from a period in the cultural life of Japan to America,” said Fred Bidwell, interim director of the Cleveland Museum of Art. “Audiences will be fascinated by how the currents of Japanese culture and style represented by our beloved collection of traditional art are reflected in the evolution of Japanese Modern art in these objects of superb craftsmanship and artistry.”

“Despite a recent surge in Western academic interest in the arts of the Meiji, Taishō, and early Showa periods, there have been few major exhibitions on Japanese modern art in the United States,” stated Sinéad Vilbar, curator of Japanese and Korean art at the Cleveland Museum of Art. “This exhibition represents a special opportunity to bring Tokyo National Museum's holdings to a wider audience in the United States.”

Several of the light-sensitive objects displayed in this exhibition, including Mount Fuji Rising above Clouds by Yokoyama Taikan (1868-1958), Meishō by Tsuchida Bakusen (1887-1936) and Spring Rain by Shimomura Kanzan (1873-1930), will rotate. The first rotation will be through Sunday, March 30 and the exhibition will re-open to the public on Thursday, April 3.

Highlights of Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum include:

Portrait of Reiko, 1921. Kishida Ryūsei (1891–1929). Oil on canvas; 48.25 x 55.88 cm. Tokyo National Museum, A-10568. Important Cultural Property.

Maiko Girl, 1893. Kuroda Seiki (1866–1924). Oil on canvas; 80.4 x 65.3cm. Tokyo National Museum, A-11258. Important Cultural Property.

Mount Fuji Rising above Clouds, c. 1913. Yokoyama Taikan (1868–1958). Pair of six-fold screens, color on gold-leafed silk; 187.2 × 416.3 cm (each screen). Tokyo National Museum, A-10533.

Spring Rain, 1916. Shimomura Kanzan (1873–1930). Pair of six-fold screens, color on silk; 190 x 406 cm (each). Tokyo National Museum, A-10517.

Footed Bowl with Applied Crabs and Brown Glaze, 1881. Miyagawa Kozan I (1842–1916). Ceramic; 37 cm. Tokyo National Museum, G-105. Important Cultural Property

Priest of Brahmanism, 1914(Taishō 3). Satō Chōzan (1888–1963). Wood with polychromy; 63.9 cm (with base). Tokyo National Museum, C-1501.

Poems from the Man’yōshū Poetry Anthology, 1959. Miyama Ryūdō (1903–1980). Two-fold screen, ink on paper; 68.8 x 121.1 cm. Tokyo National Museum, B-3148.

Tickets

Adult tickets for Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum and Van Gogh Repetitions are $20 and include re-entry to view the second rotation of objects. The exhibition is free for museum members. Complementary exhibition programming includes lectures, tours and educational programs.

Related Programming

Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum is accompanied by related programming. For more information and updates, please refer to www.clevelandart.org.

Gallery Talk
Remaking Tradition
Sunday, February 16, 2014
2:00 p.m.
Free; exhibition ticket required
Sinéad Vilbar, curator of Japanese and Korean Art

Changing Images of the Body in Modern Japanese Art
Saturday, March 15, 2014
2:00 p.m.
Free

Dr. Bert Winther-Tamaki, chair of Art History and
Professor of Visual Culture at the University of California

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
6:30 p.m.
Free

Sponsored by Case Western Reserve University
Gregory Levine, historian of Japanese art and architecture

Wednesday, April 23, 2014
6:30 p.m.
Free

Sponsored by Case Western Reserve University
Dr. Alice Tseng

In Conversation
Remaking Tradition
Saturday, May 3, 2014
2:00 p.m.

Free; exhibition ticket required.
Eriko Tomizawa-Kay, fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

MIX: 現代
Friday, March 7, 2014
5:00–9:00 p.m.

Your MIX ticket grants free access to this stunning exhibition featuring Japanese art from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Tickets are $7, $9 day of event; CMA members FREE.

“Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum” is organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Tokyo National Museum. This partnership with the Tokyo National Museum is an achievement made possible by the support of the Japan Foundation.

About the Cleveland Museum of Art

The Cleveland Museum of Art is renowned for the quality and breadth of its collection, which includes almost 45,000 objects and spans 6,000 years of achievement in the arts. The museum is a significant international forum for exhibitions, scholarship, performing arts and art education and recently completed an ambitious, multi-phase renovation and expansion project across its campus. One of the top comprehensive art museums in the nation and free of charge to all, the Cleveland Museum of Art is located in the dynamic University Circle neighborhood.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is supported by a broad range of individuals, foundations and businesses in Cleveland and Northeast Ohio. The museum is generously funded by Cuyahoga County residents through Cuyahoga Arts and Culture. Additional support comes from the Ohio Arts Council, which helps fund the museum with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, educational excellence and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. For more information about the museum, its holdings, programs and events, call 888-CMA-0033 or visit www.ClevelandArt.org.