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“The Banjo: A New Day for an Old Instrument” opens at the Museum of Making Music

The banjo, the twangy cords are unmistakable and the classic American instrument is making a comeback. It is a staple of folk and country songs and an exciting addition to rock and other types of music. The instrument was created in Africa and has now risen to such popularity that many different Grammy artists feature it in their music. The Museum of Making Music is exploring the history and culture behind the banjo in their exhibit, “The Banjo: A New Day for an Old Instrument”. Which will be debuting on Mar. 29 and be on display until Oct. of 2014.

The Museum of Making Music is exploring the history and culture behind the banjo in their exhibit, “The Banjo: A New Day for an Old Instrument”. Which will be debuting on Mar. 29 and be on display until Oct. of 2014.
The Museum of Making Music is exploring the history and culture behind the banjo in their exhibit, “The Banjo: A New Day for an Old Instrument”. Which will be debuting on Mar. 29 and be on display until Oct. of 2014.
The Museum of Making Music

The multimedia exhibit will feature a collection of historic instruments and replicas that show the evolution from the first banjo-like instrument to modernized versions. There will be interactive exhibits - including a workbench exhibit, which has been provided by the San Diego-based Deering Banjo Company, and will allow visitors to see how the banjo is created and how the form has evolved over time.

The opening musical concert will take place on Mar. 29 and will feature Victoria Ghost, the sibling duo of Ashley and Shannon Campbell, which blends old styles of music with new sounds to create something completely different. They take influences from folk, indie, bluegrass and county-soul to create a harmony of music on stage. The price for the Victoria Ghost is $22 for general seating and $28 for premium seating, tickets can be purchased online. To view other upcoming artists that will be performing from the opening of the banjo exhibit until when it closes in Oct. visit the museum’s event page.

The Museum staff hopes that the exhibit along with the concert series will change how people think of the instrument, and realize how versatile and exciting the banjo is. The Museum of Making Music is committed to inspiring the public about the history of music and musical instruments. They highlight, through interactive exhibits and shows, the connections that music makes with people. The Museum of making Music is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission to the museum is $8 for adults, $5 for students, seniors and military and children under five have free admission.