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The axis of idiots

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Just like the Three Stooges, Kim Jong Eun, Raul Castro, and the ghost of Nikita Khrushchev have demonstrated their Soviet era hijinks in true nincompoop fashion in the latest episode of the axis of idiots. These wild and crazy guys just couldn't be satisfied sucking down Cuban cigars, tequila, and old memories of Communist grandeur. No; they had to go and break out the antiquated relics of Socialist past.

The antiaircraft systems, Mig 21 fighter jets, and Kalashnikov rifles were relics in their day. But their reintroduction into the realm of modern-day Marxism was fitting in lieu of the fact that 57 Chevys and Farm-All tractors mark the cutting edge of technology in Castro’s Communist utopia.

Could it have been a celebrative moment for North Korean and Cuban defense analysts when the cargo ship, Chong Chon Gang, left port from Cuba in route to the Panama Canal? Had they gotten away with their grand arms smuggling scheme?

Imagine this. You are the captain of a North Korean cargo ship named after a strange brew of lackluster and defunct Communist dupes. You are sailing the seas of the Western Hemisphere in plain view of the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard.

You have been sequestered by the clan of your ship’s name to smuggle Soviet era arms through the Panama Canal and back to North Korea for reverse engineering. You know that the supreme leader, Kim Jong Eun must keep North Korea on the cutting edge of technological improvement as to defeat the devil from the West.

You also know that the U.S. is watching your bone-yard laden sugar-ship like an eagle watches a scampering prairie dog in a field of prickly-pears. Indeed, the drones are buzzing about and you wonder if all the stories about Hell-Fire missiles raining down death are true. And then you wonder if the gig is up as your ship is searched by Panamanian authorities.

Perhaps you would have been better off smuggling 57 Chevys and Farm-All tractors back to North Korea. They probably would have been as effective as the rusty remnants of Khrushchev’s glory days.

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