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The Alaska Dispatch tell how real the Alaskan reality shows are

NEW YORK - MARCH 30: Captain of the fishing boat Northwestern on Discovery's Deadliest Catch Sig Hansen attends the Natural Resources Defense Council's 11th Annual `Forces For Nature' Benefit at 583 Park Avenue on March 30, 2009 in New York City.
NEW YORK - MARCH 30: Captain of the fishing boat Northwestern on Discovery's Deadliest Catch Sig Hansen attends the Natural Resources Defense Council's 11th Annual `Forces For Nature' Benefit at 583 Park Avenue on March 30, 2009 in New York City.
Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images

The truth is out on reality TV shows featuring life in Alaska, the 49th state. According to the Alaska Dispatch, the staff wanted to rank which Alaskan reality shows were the 10 worst. The trouble is, there were too many bad TV reality shows filmed in Alaska. They couldn’t decide which show was the worst.

The only reality TV series that they could agree on that depicted life in Alaska the best was, “Deadliest Catch.” To them, the rest did not portray the Alaskan people or life in Alaska with much, if any, truthfulness other than being filmed in the state.

Marty Raney, star of “Ultimate Survival Alaska” described Alaska as virgin ground if you go a mile off road. The only inhabitants who have walked across it would be the animals who live there.

Alaska Dispatch tells another story. “Truth be told, if you go a mile off the road in most places, aside from where the road goes through federally protected lands, you’re probably trespassing in someone’s yard. Beyond a mile, the state gets wilder, but it’s all been mapped and trodden, and Alaskans are game-managing the hell out of it.”

The elk hunts depicted on “Wild West Alaska” were filmed at a farm that raises elk. Another show, “Life Below Zero” is about Sue Aikens who lives "all alone" at the Kavik River Camp. She may live by herself, but she still has a camera crew, and internet connection. Then there are the hunters, hikers and fishermen who like to go there for the sport or recreation.

Although it is true that the majority of Alaskan people live in the cities or suburbs, they don't make for exciting television. However, for people who think outside the box and don't mind showing their wild side, there is probably a producer waiting to hear that story idea. Like any staged TV show, they tempt fate on a daily basis, but no harm ever comes to them while the cameras are rolling. Rumors have it that some shows use stunt doubles and security officers to ensure everyone’s safety.

Reality TV is generally entertaining, but not very real life. Do you think that reality TV shows go too far and are too fake? Tell why or why not in the comments section.