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Taller people have a 30% lower risk of plaque build-up in their arteries

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What's the connection between an adult's height and the prevalence of coronary artery calcium, a direct marker of plaque in the arteries that feed the heart? A new paper just published suggests that taller adults tend to have lower levels of plaque, and thus, a lower risk of CHD. New research shows a correlation between adult height and underlying heart disease, according to the study.

Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation research cardiologist Dr. Michael Miedema is the lead author of a paper. You can read online the abstract of the paper, "Adult Height and Prevalence of Coronary Artery Calcium: The NHLBI Family Heart Study," published by Circulation - Cardiovascular Imaging, a journal of the American Heart Association.

Coronary artery calcium is a strong predictor of future heart attacks with a nearly 10 fold increase in the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with elevated CAC. So your goal is to keep your calcium in your bones and teeth where it belongs, and not in your arteries. Not related to the study, but of value to anyone are articles that you also may wish to check out, such as the following: "Protecting Bone And Arterial Health With Vitamin K2 - Life Extension" and "Vitamin K2 Controls Removal of Calcium From Arteries." Or see the articles, "Vitamin K Prevents Vitamin D from Promoting Heart Disease - Mercola" or "The Delicate Dance Between Vitamins D and K - Mercola."

The new study suggests a connection between an adult's height and the prevalence of coronary artery calcium (CAC), a direct marker of plaque in the arteries that feed the heart

The article is based on research in 2,703 patients from the Family Heart Study, a government sponsored study of the relationship between potential risk factors and heart disease and is the first study to examine the relationship between adult height and CAC in a large population. It suggests that taller adults tend to have lower levels of plaque, and thus, a lower risk of CHD. This relationship persisted even after accounting for standard cardiovascular risk factors such as age, smoking, high cholesterol, and diabetes.

"A potential link between height and CHD has been shown in several studies but the mechanism of this relationship has not been clear and our study suggests the relationship is mediated by plaque build up in the coronary arteries," explains Michael Miedema, MD, MPH, from the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, according to the December 12, 2013 news release, "Research shows correlation between adult height and underlying heart disease."

"There may be as much as 30% lower risk of plaque build-up in the top quarter of tallest adults compared to the bottom quarter. These results had to be adjusted for gender, given the differences in height between men and women, but the relationship was consistent in both men and women."

Why taller individuals develop less plaque is not entirely clear

"Some studies suggest that taller people have favorable changes in their blood pressure due their height but these changes are quite small and unlikely to be the sole cause of this relationship," Miedema states, according to the news release. "It may be more likely that this relationship is mediated through a common link, such as childhood nutrition or other environmental factors during childhood, which may be determinants of both adult height as well as future coronary heart disease."

This report is presented on behalf of the investigators of the NHLBI Family Heart Study. Funding sources include National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute cooperative agreement grants. The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation is dedicated to improving people's lives through the highest quality cardiovascular research and education.

Scientific Innovation and Research – Publishing more than 120 peer-reviewed studies each year, MHIF is a recognized research leader in the broadest range of cardiovascular medicine. Each year, cardiologists and hospitals around the world adopt MHIF protocols to save lives and improve patient care.

Education and Outreach – Research shows that modifying specific health behaviors can significantly reduce the risk of developing heart disease

Through community programs, screenings and presentations, MHIF educates people of all walks of life about heart health. The goal of the Foundation's community outreach is to increase personal awareness of risk factors and provide the tools necessary to help people pursue heart- healthy lifestyles.

The Minneapolis Heart Institute® is recognized internationally as one of the world's leading providers of heart and vascular care. This state-of-the-art facility combines the finest in personalized patient care with sophisticated technology in a unique, family-oriented environment. The Institute's programs, a number of which are conducted in conjunction with Abbott Northwestern Hospital, address the full range of heart and vascular health needs: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation.

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