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Suspected Syrian jihadi bomb maker extradited to U.S.

Despite the need for human intelligence regarding Syria, Iraq and Islamic terrorist groups, the Obama administration proudly announced on Thursday that a radical Muslim from Syria, who was extradited by the police in Turkey to Phoenix, Arizona, and who faces a number of federal terrorism charges, appeared in federal criminal court instead of being interviewed and interrogated for intelligence, according to a Justice Department report.

A Syrian terrorist and bomb maker was extradited to the U.S. for trial.
A Syrian terrorist and bomb maker was extradited to the U.S. for trial.
Police and Security News/J. Walker

The suspect, Ahmad Ibrahim Al-Ahmad, is charged with a number of counts, including conspiracy to use improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, in plots against U.S. fighting forces and military vehicles during the Iraqi insurgency between 2005 and 2010, according to an FBI statement.

"Al-Ahmad's charges also include conspiracy to use a weapon of mass destruction, conspiracy to damage or destroy U.S. government property by means of an explosive and conspiracy to commit extraterritorial murder of a U.S. national, among others," according to the indictment.

In addition, the 39-year-old Syrian allegedly supplied materials to an Iraqi insurgent group, known as the 1920 Revolution Brigades, for use in making IEDs to target U.S. and coalition military personnel during that five-year period. The 1920 Revolution Brigades is a Sunni terrorist group in Iraq, which is comprised of former members of the disbanded Iraqi army.

"While this capture should be applauded, it's still a mystery to me why we would bring this terrorist into the United States and treat him like a bank robber or swindler. He should be in Gitmo [Guantanamo Bay, Cuba] being interrogated for intelligence purposes. This [Obama] administration is really dysfunctional," said former anti-terrorism unit police detective Joseph Kiernan.

Justice Department and FBI documents reveal that Al-Ahmad obtained the components needed by bomb makers to create radio-controlled IEDs. The dual-use bomb parts were purchased by the suspect from a company headquartered in the Arizona, according to court documents.

The prosecutors and FBI agents said, "[T]hat the parts [given to the 1920 Revolution Brigades] were believed to be used in a 2007 attack near the Baghdad International Airport, that left three U.S. soldiers dead. Also, the IEDs allegedly manufactured in a Baghdad home by Al-Ahmad were used in a 2007 attack that killed one U.S. soldier and [wounded] four others."

Al-Ahmad was originally charged in May 2011 and but wasn't arrested until he crossed the border from Syria into Turkey. He was held by the Turkish police until Wednesday when he was extradited from Turkey to Arizona, according to the FBI statement.

Al-Ahmad is facing a maximum life sentence and his trial is scheduled for Oct. 7, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona.