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Summer With a Homeschooled Kid

Rocking Summer!-slide0
Emily L. Goodman

As a homeschooling parent, you’re pretty much used to being home with your kids all day, every day. You aren’t surprised by the demands of having little people running around while you try to get things done; you know that they have to be entertained at least part of the time. Still, somehow, you always manage to be unprepared for the chaos of summer.

No structured lessons. Nothing that they have to complete each day. No projects that you can send them to work on.

There are still chores to do, and books to be read, and plenty of activities to engage in…but a bored kid won’t see any of them. What’s a homeschooling mom to do?

Check out local parks. Go a little outside your usual locations and see what else is available. You may be surprised by what parks lurk just off the beaten track. Do you usually go to the playground? Take a little bit longer walk and feed the ducks. Do you stick to one park? Check out some of the others in the area. A quick Google search will give you a good idea of what’s out there in your area.

Go swimming. If you have a pool, a friend with a pool, or a good spot on a nearby lake, you can take the kids out to play in the water—which will likely result in hours of fun for everyone. Something about kids and water just makes for a winning combination. Have enough little ones that you’re not comfortable taking them swimming alone? A splash pad might just make a great alternative.

Check out the library or used bookstore. Brand new books are always more exciting than old ones, even if those old ones haven’t been read quite yet. Make it a field trip, and you’ll at least have staved off a few hours of, “But what are we going to do now?”

Have a play date. All those friends who are usually in school are now available to come over and play. Sure, it adds one more bickering child to the mix; but a new bickering child makes it exciting!

Visit local attractions. The best way to do this is to choose one for the summer and pick up a pass so that you can go back again and again without having to worry about the cost.

Plan trips for the weekends. Give the kids something to look forward to, and make plans with your spouse at the same time. It will give all of you something to get excited about.

Check out some fun crafts. They don’t have to be Pinterest-worthy to be fun for the kids.

And, if all else fails, let them be bored. You don’t have to entertain them every minute of every day—and you might be fascinated by what they come up with to do in the absence of your direction.