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Students are trashing school lunches with healthier food choices

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Nationally, the cost of wasted school breakfast and lunch food overall — including milk, meats and grains — is estimated at more than $1 billion annually because kids are tossing what they get on their plate at school into trash cans. You may wish to check out the The New York Times article, "No Appetite for Good-for-You School Lunches."

Even though now students in public schools get more fruits and vegetables under new rules, the lunch usually ends up in the trash. Healthier lunches face student rejection. Besides the requirements of having to include fruit and vegetables on school meal plates, students are tired of seeing a hair now and then in one of the foods on their plates at school meals.

Federal rules require students to take at least three items each day, but an L.A. Unified manager wants to change the policy to reduce the $100,000 in food thrown away daily, says an April 1, 2014 Los Angeles Times article by Teresa Watanabe, "Solutions sought to reduce food waste at schools."

Is the the fault of the child's family if the student in middle or high school dumps the lunch because it contains vegetables and fruit if the student isn't eating a variety of vegetables and fruits at home frequently?

Some parents can't afford the price of vegetables and fruits, don't have the space to grow their own, and present family examples at home of eating foods such as heated chips or crisps and sweet juices instead of a variety of foods that contain a wide range of tastes--tart, sweet, salty (in moderation), butter, and pungent (spicy). You may wish to check out the Modern Farmer article, "Food Waste: The Next Food Revolution."

If the student doesn't see people in the home eating healthy foods that include at least five cups of vegetables and some fruit daily from early childhood, the child will gravitate to what's affordable and familiar such as chips, dips, and sugary beverages and sweet juices. At school, food often gets dumped in the trash can, and kids sneak in junk food, usually fries, chips, and crisps or candy and cookies. You may wish to check out the site, "Most children get food and beverage marketing at school, study says. Or see, " USDA closes troubled Central Valley slaughterhouse over cleanliness."

In the Los Angeles Times article, "Solutions sought to reduce food waste at schools," noteworthy is the mention that in the Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation's second-largest school system, which serves 650,000 meals a day, students throw out at least $100,000 worth of food a day — and probably far more. Because of such waste the loss is about $18 million a year — based on a conservative estimate of 10% food waste.

Students are dumping the type of fruits or vegetables because they don't like the taste or are unfamiliar with a variety of tastes. The fruits served aren't expensive strawberries or watermelon when in season, the students don't like the sometimes sour taste of the fruit that's served, such as apricots.

And apricots usually are not familiar to students unless they came from areas of the world here apricots are served in salads, for example, chick pea, olive, apricot salads in a savory sauce, familiar in the Eastern Mediterranean, or in some natural food stores, but not what most school kids eat daily in Los Angeles who are not familiar with food from that area of the world, even though apricots alone are found in most supermarkets when in season. You may wish to check out, "Solutions sought to reduce food waste at schools."

Under federal school meal rules finalized in 2012, students must take at least three items — including one fruit or vegetable — even if they don't want them. Otherwise, the federal government won't reimburse school districts for the meals

The present result is that food ends up in the school trash can, and students resort to junk food bought elsewhere and brought to schools hidden in backpacks, tote bags, and other places where chips and juice can be hidden. You may wish to check out the CNN.com article, "USDA issues new rules for school meals."

What's happening is that repeated exposure to fruits and vegetables seems to be coming too late. The exposure should have happened when the children were beginning to eat solid food at an age when babies start to eat fruit and vegetables, usually pureed in a blender if the parents don't want to buy baby food in jars.

It's familiarity with vegetables and fruits that get kids so used to eating them, and they see adults eating the same food, that they form the habit of eating healthier foods. Otherwise, the obesity issue becomes troublesome as more kids eat more starchy fillers, salty chips, fries, burgers, pizzas, and the usual melted fatty cheese over salty deep fried chips.

Meanwhile the cost of the food tossed in the trash cans are a problem as children come to school sometimes in a pre-diabetic state or with arteries starting to harden because they don't connect food with health, and often parents are not connecting particular foods with health issues.

There's a national debate over how to improve child nutrition

If you look at the facts, currently there's massive food waste. Costs are rising. The Los Angeles Times article mentions an $11.6-billion federal school lunch program, which feeds 31 million students daily

On one hand, there's the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids with specific requirements on calories, portion sizes, even the color of fruits and vegetables to be served. The rules also increased the amount of fruits, vegetables and whole grains that must be offered. The result is that school districts have to pay more for food, but so much of the healthier food is dumped in the trash cans by the students because they complain the taste is nasty.

The solution may start with asking why does the food taste so bad that it's trashed? Most questions are met with the fact that schools are paying more to observe the rules such as offering a fruit and a vegetable. Is the fruit the type of fruit the students want? And is the vegetable overcooked and mushy or made to taste and look appealing to the students?

Students have to take the fruit or the vegetable or the schools won't receive federal reimbursement for the meal. The waste is in millions of dollars. The extra vegetable and fruit costs school districts $5.4 million a day, with $3.8 million of that being tossed in the trash, according to national estimates based on a 2013 study of 15 Utah schools by researchers with Cornell University and Brigham Young University.

Before the rules changed, students were required only to take a vegetable or a fruit. Now they have to take on their plate a vegetable and a fruit. It makes more trash if the student isn't familiar with eating lots of vegetables and fruits at each meal. If you check out other studies, you'll see a waste of about 40% of all the lunches served in certain schools, such as four Boston schools, mentioned in the Los Angeles Times article.

Why is there such a significant aversion to eating a fruit or a vegetable at lunch time?

Kids can't take the fruit, such as an apple off the school campus. So they don't get to eat the fruit or vegetable they couldn't eat at lunch for an after-school snack. If parents aren't serving similar fruits and vegetables at home, the kids won't have the chance to eat that apple or other fruit or vegetable as a snack when they get hungry again or as a dessert hours later. It's as if the kids are in prison and food is contraband. There's no brown bag or plastic bag where kids can take an apple home.

Teachers may have thought that if they were allowed to take fruit out of the cafeteria, kids would probably throw the apple and injure another student as an abusive joke or toss that banana skin on the sidewalk so someone would slip and fall as a prank that ends up injuring, and the school, in turn would be sued. So no food is permitted off the campus.

There's also the federal Good Samaritan food law that allows such actions to aid people in need. But not enough schools participate to solve the massive waste problem, explains the Los Angeles Tines article.

Breakfast in the Classroom program

In Los Angeles, for example students in the Unified District public schools are required to take the three items offered which includes a fruit and a vegetable. Should the requirement forcing students to take a fruit or vegetable be suspended? What should the rules require regarding lower sodium? Should schools stop serving half and start serving full whole grain in food products?

Schools want changes that don't increase unnecessary costs. Students don't want to be forced to take foods on their plate they won't eat. And parents want kids to eat healthy foods at school, especially if the parents can't afford enough healthier foods at home.

One one hand, the rules have helped students who want the healthier foods find a way to eat them at a price the student, especially children from low-income homes, can afford. On the other hand, if students are getting up to half their daily calories at school, the kids at least would get the chance to eat more fruits and vegetables.

The problem is that too many children are throwing away the healthier foods (vegetables and fruits) because the kids are not familiar with the taste of vegetables and fruits or the vegetables are overcooked or the fruits too sour because the kids are not familiar with sour fruits. More expensive fruits such as watermelon would not be as tart as some of the fruit they're being served. See, "A well-planned vegan diet can be perfectly healthy."

Some schools have invited professional chefs to make the healthier foods taste better to children unfamiliar with how vegetables and fruits are supposed to taste

In addition to chefs, planting school gardens and scheduling recess before lunch are all proven ways to help kids eat healthier foods. Many children listen to rumors since their were toddlers on how healthy foods aren't supposed to taste good. The fruit and vegetables get a reputation stigma. And sometimes boys are told vegetables and fruits are not masculine.

The kids don't get to see the vegan bodybuilders or runners and other athletes give talks on what they eat to prepare for their athletic competitions. Kids might also listen to a talk on what Navy Seals in training get to eat for maximum health and endurance.

How would your child thrive on a diet that's 70% carbs, 15% protein, and 30% fat? The current Navy Seal diet turns the high protein "Paleo" so-called "cave-man" diet on its head.

Those percentages on the menu are the maximum amounts of carbs, proteins, and fats suggested for the Navy Seals workout diet. In fact, the Navy Seals diet and workout appeals to numerous teenagers and some of their parents.

Every since the recently highly publicized Navy SEAL mission in Pakistan, youth and even middle-aged individuals are running to local gyms for fitness training similar to what Navy Seals take, including a taste of diets that Navy SEALS eat while in training for endurance.

See the website of the Navy SEAL nutrition guide. Download the PDF file book to see what type of diet Navy SEALs are supposed to eat. Also see the article on the Sacramento Plastic Surgeon's Blog, My Brother, the Navy SEAL, by a Sacramento-based plastic surgeon.

Do you want to follow the diet that Navy SEALs eat?

What Navy SEALs in training actually eat is a high carb diet rather than a mostly animal protein diet, which could result in gout--too much uric acid in the blood from too much meat, fish, or poultry.

The Navy SEAL nutrition guide contains information on what to eat for meals and snacks and why you need the specific amounts of carbs, fats, proteins, and other nutrients. The Navy SEAL Diet is approximately 60-70 percent carbs, 10-15 percent protein, and 10-20 percent fats.

The Navy SEAL diet suggests that high carbohydrates are best for endurance

This turns the high protein "Paleo" so-called "cave-man" diet on its head. It's not the Paleo diet that's recommended for the type of endurance and strength that Navy Seals need in their training and mission work.

Now people who are not in the military services can attend various gyms to go through a workout similar to what Navy SEALs take in their training. For example, those not in the military can train in a gym, and the fittest of the fit who are up to what Navy SEALs endure in training can move on to what's called SEAL FIT camp. There's a camp like that in California, in Encinitas, mentioned in the Sacramento Bee (Associate Press) article.

For the qualified, those who want the ultimate in Navy SEALs fitness training move on to what's called SEAL FIT camp. The camp takes place during the Navy's "Hell Week." At the camp, SEAL candidates who actually are in the military service train to endure more than five days of exercise on fewer than four hours of daily sleep. But for those only interested in what Navy SEALs eat to maintain that type of endurance to do the exercise, the nutrient intake consists of the following calories:

Celebrity chefs, such as Jamie Oliver, have helped develop menus. More than 270 schools offer "harvest of the month" lessons about produce, and 450 schools have started campus gardens. Still the food piles up in school trash cans, says the L.A. Times article

Interestingly, school football players eat the vegetables and fruit. They need the energy. What students in the L.A. school district were eating was what was most familiar. For example, potato wedges were chosen because they taste more like french fries, that kids are familiar with from eating at fast-food eateries or at home, when meals may resemble fast food takeout more than soups, stews, or casseroles and veggie loafs.

Another problem students don't like is when there's a hair in their school food. It happens sometimes, and student's trash the food as soon as they see a hair in a burger or elsewhere on the plate.

Which foods can help you grow longer telomeres to perhaps extend your life

Foods that are said to keep short telomeres from getting shorter focus on fruits and vegetables and other plant extracts such as resveratrol that make up a part of balanced nutrition. In some research studies, fish oil also was named. Can you grow longer telomeres? They are the protective caps on your chromosomes that keep a cell's DNA stable, but shorten with age.

The shorter your telomeres are, the faster you age and experience the diseases of aging. The longer the telomere, the healthier the cell. After age 50, women's telomeres may grow longer or not get short as fast as men's over age 50. Short telomeres may signal shorter lifespan. But scientists are researching how to slow down the shortening of your telomeres or even grow them longer and possibly extend lifespan. Also see, Short Sleep Duration Is Associated with Shorter Telomere Length.

You'll see various nutrition ads touting how supplements or foods can lengthen the caps on your chromosomes. You could help yourself by researching whether nutrition can influence your telomere length with such supplements as resveratrol and pterostilbene that mimic caloric restriction.

Recently studies explore not only foods, but also how stress in childhood could shorten your telomeres, for example looking at childhood abuse. The question for researchers is whether childhood abuse or a bad marriage shortens the telomeres that speed up your aging process. Which shortens the telomeres more: stress or unbalanced nutrition?

Research continues on this notion, as no final conclusion has been in the news yet as to how to grow your telomeres longer after they've been shortened by time, wear, or stress. According to the Nov. 21, 2009 BBC article, "Childhood abuse speeds up body's aging process," physical or emotional abuse in childhood may shorten telomeres and speed up the aging process later in life. Chromosomes have telomeres at the end of each strand.

As you get older, the telomeres grow shorter.

But if you were abused as a child or perceived emotional issues as abuse, do your telomeres get shorter, thereby causing you to age faster with a shorter life span? That's what the new study is trying to find out. The Brown University study suggests that emotional or physical abuse as a child could speed up the body's aging process.

A team from Brown University focused on telomeres, the protective caps on the chromosomes that keep a cell's DNA stable but shorten with age, according to the BBC article. What the study actually looked at were the telomeres of 31 people. Each person reported childhood abuse. Scientists wanted to found out whether the telomeres shortened faster, thereby speeding up cells' ageing process.

But before you reach for nutritional supplements that are supposed to keep your telomeres from shortening too quickly, the experts are warning that the study needs to be repeated on a larger scale. Thirty-one people is a small number. You can read more about the study in the journal, Biological Psychiatry. The lead researcher is Dr. Audrey Tyrka.

Before you jump to any conclusions about how fast your telomeres are shortening due to something you can't help that happened in early childhood, the studies will have to look at early developmental experiences. What the scientists were trying to find out is whether childhood abuse or even if you perceive emotional stress as abuse could have profound effects on biology. The question is can perceived emotions or physical abuse influence cellular mechanisms at a very basic level?

What are telomeres?

They are short sections of specialized DNA that sit at the ends of all our chromosomes. Think of a telomere as the plastic tip at the end of your shoelace that keeps the fabric from fraying. The study is trying to find out whether childhood abuse increases your risk for illness. They have been compared to the plastic tips at the ends of shoelaces that prevent the laces from unraveling.

How you actually age is that when cells divide over time the telomeres get shorter. When they get so short that they can't reproduce, you die. If you expose yourself to toxins such as smoking and radiation, the telomeres shorten at a faster rate. Tell that to your dentist when he/she insists on frequent full-head X-rays on older machines.

It's not only childhood abuse that might shorten telomeres, but also psychological and psychiatric issues. Basically, childhood trauma can shorten your telomeres and your life. But can a bad marriage do the same to adults? It's how you perceive the trauma. What happens is that if you have an emotional trauma in early childhood, you might also store up problems for the future that are similar in nature.

Science is trying to find a way for you to override your bad genes with food, nutrients, and removing toxic substances such as plasticizers from your body.

Okay, not every one your bad genes can be fixed. But certainly a healthy diet may have some benefit on some of your genetic variations. Your genes that have those little tags and switches that sometimes healthy foods can be of help to turn on the good genes and turn off the bad genes. Other influences besides food, plant extracts, and other nutrients, are sometimes lifestyle changes such as walking 45 minutes several days a week. Then there are holistic exercises such as Qi Gong or Tai Chi for balance.

Nutritional epigenetics

How you do override your bad genes is by protecting all your genes with antioxidants and oils that have gene repair abilities. Switching on the good genes that repair other genes is part of the science of epigenetics.

To protect your genes, first look to fish oil containing enough DHA. Why? Because DHA helps to repair 504 genes. But the DHA needs to be balanced with EPA to work. Is the vitamin consultant at your health food store experienced enough to guide you?

What about the nutritionist you consult at your HMO? Who can you turn to? Start reading for self-empowerment to at least know how various nutrients affects your body. Next, do you know whether you are getting enough zinc, but not too much because zinc is in charge of 33 gene?

You can talk to your health care provider to find out if you have a deficiency of vitamin D3. Some nutritionists suggest vitamin D3, in its natural form, not the synthetic D2. This information may be because vitamin D3 communicates with more than 200 genes. How much do you need? 1,000mg? Less?

What does your body require to override bad gene tags that need to be switched off while the good gene tags are switched on? Find out whether you have a genetic variation that makes it worse if you take vitamin D supplements perhaps by calcifying your arteries. It's important to tailor your supplements to the way your body handles them, or get your nutrition in the active form from foods.

Can you grow longer telomeres?

The shorter your telomeres are, the faster you age and experience the diseases of aging. The longer the telomere, the healthier the cell. After age 50, women's telomeres may grow longer or not get short as fast as men's over age 50. Short telomeres may signal shorter lifespan. But scientists are researching how to slow down the shortening of your telomeres or even grow them longer and possibly extend lifespan.

Research continues on this notion, as no final conclusion has been in the news yet as to how to grow your telomeres longer after they've been shortened by time, wear, or stress. According to the Nov. 21, 2009 BBC article, "Childhood abuse speeds up body's aging process," physical or emotional abuse in childhood may shorten telomeres and speed up the aging process later in life. Chromosomes have telomeres at the end of each strand.

As you get older, the telomeres grow shorter. But if you were abused as a child or perceived emotional issues as abuse, do your telomeres get shorter, thereby causing you to age faster with a shorter life span? That's what the new study is trying to find out. The Brown University study suggests that emotional or physical abuse as a child could speed up the body's aging process.

A team from Brown University focused on telomeres, the protective caps on the chromosomes that keep a cell's DNA stable but shorten with age, according to the BBC article. What the study actually looked at were the telomeres of 31 people. Each person reported childhood abuse. Scientists wanted to found out whether the telomeres shortened faster, thereby speeding up cells' ageing process.

But before you reach for nutritional supplements that are supposed to keep your telomeres from shortening too quickly, the experts are warning that the study needs to be repeated on a larger scale. Thirty-one people is a small number. You can read more about the study in the journal, Biological Psychiatry. The lead researcher is Dr. Audrey Tyrka.

Before you jump to any conclusions about how fast your telomeres are shortening due to something you can't help that happened in early childhood, the studies will have to look at early developmental experiences. What the scientists were trying to find out is whether childhood abuse or even if you perceive emotional stress as abuse could have profound effects on biology. The question is can perceived emotions or physical abuse influence cellular mechanisms at a very basic level?

You could help yourself by researching whether nutrition can influence your telomere length with such supplements as resveratrol and pterostilbene that mimic caloric restruction. But what this study looked at was not so much what might reverse the effects on your telomeres of childhood stress and abuse, but whether the abuse itself shortens the telomeres that speed up your aging process.

Short sections of specialized DNA that cap the chromosomes

Telomeres are short sections of specialized DNA that sit at the ends of all our chromosomes. Think of a telomere as the plastic tip at the end of your shoelace that keeps the fabric from fraying. The study is trying to find out whether childhood abuse increases your risk for illness. They have been compared to the plastic tips at the ends of shoelaces that prevent the laces from unraveling.

How you actually age is that when cells divide over time the telomeres get shorter. When they get so short that they can't reproduce, you die. If you expose yourself to toxins such as smoking and radiation, the telomeres shorten at a faster rate. Tell that to your dentist when he/she insists on frequent full-head X-rays on older machines.

It's not only childhood abuse that might shorten telomeres, but also psychological and psychiatric issues. Basically, childhood trauma can shorten your telomeres and your life. But can a bad marriage do the same to adults? It's how you perceive the trauma. What happens is that if you have an emotional trauma in early childhood, you might also store up problems for the future that are similar in nature.

Childhood stress and short telomeres

The study worked with healthy people without psychiatric problems who reported abuse in childhood. But before you jump to conclusions, a lot more study is needed to find the specific impact of childhood abuse, emotional stress, or trauma on how fast your cells age. Scientists already found that chronic stress shortens telomeres, but how much, how fast? For further information, also see, "Childhood abuse speeds up body's ageing process," or "Mutant genes 'key to long life."

The big question is, if your telomeres are speeding up because of early emotional trauma, stress, or abuse, what can you do about it? Are there nutritional programs, supplements, or dietary regimens and relaxation exercises that can reverse and restore your telomeres so you can stay free longer from the diseases of rapid aging?

Science is trying to find a way for you to override your bad genes with food, nutrients, and removing toxic substances such as plasticizers from your body.

Okay, not every one your bad genes can be fixed. But certainly many of your genetic variations that have those little tags and switches that you can turn on and off with food, nutrients, and sometimes lifestyles such as walking 45 minutes several days a week.

How you do override your bad genes is by protecting all your genes with antioxidants and oils that have gene repair abilities. Switching on the good genes that repair other genes is part of the science of epigenetics.

To protect your genes, first look to fish oil containing enough DHA. Why? Because DHA helps to repair 504 genes. But the DHA needs to be balanced with EPA to work. Is the vitamin consultant at your health food store experienced enough to guide you?

What about the nutritionist you consult at your HMO? Who can you turn to? Start reading for self-empowerment to at least know how various nutrients affects your body. Next, do you know whether you are getting enough zinc, but not too much because zinc is in charge of 33 gene?

You can talk to your health care provider to find out if you have a deficiency of vitamin D3. Some nutritionists suggest vitamin D3, in its natural form, not the synthetic D2. This information may be because vitamin D3 communicates with more than 200 genes. How much do you need? 1,000mgs? Less?

What does your body require to override bad gene tags that need to be switched off while the good gene tags are switched on? Find out whether you have a genetic variation that makes it worse if you take vitamin D supplements perhaps by calcifying your arteries. It's important to tailor your supplements to the way your body handles them, or get your nutrition in the active form from foods.

How can you help yourself to override your bad gene variations?

Whatever gets rid of all that plastic in our bodies. It's glutathione (Recancostat) because it binds to some toxic chemicals in your body and flushes them into your liver, gall bladder, and colon, finally removing them from your body.

Plastics show up 10,000 times more than other pollutants in our bodies, even more than heavy metals. And there's a pathway that rids your body of plastics. Your body makes glucuronic acid that catches nasty chemicals like glutathione, where they end up in your color or urine and are eliminated as waste.

Intestinal enzymes can force you to re-absorb toxic chemicals back into your body

These are some ways to override bad stuff. But look out for enzymes made by your intestines that force you to re-absorb toxic chemicals back into your body. Guess what makes these enzymes in your gut? It's red meat eaten in large quantities or in diets that constantly emphasize red meat, especially char-broiled red meat.

This enzyme made by your gut after you eat lots of red meat is called beta-glucuronidase. So now you need a safety net, and your body makes D-glucaraic acid that stops your enzyme called B-glucuronidase from putting toxic chemicals back into your bloodstream.

D-glucaraic acid is an enzyme made by your gut after you eat lots of red meat

The information on this you'll find in a lot greater detail in Total Wellness newsletter, April 2009. But the point of this is that there are nutrients and foods out there that are simple, wholesome, and cost-efficient that have the ability to override a lot of your bad genes and reduce the risk in them at least while you're eating right.

Your health care professional can let you know whether you need vitamin B12 or a multiple vitamin in a sublingual form you can absorb better as you age, or whole foods, or maybe CO-Q10 or magnesium, or even Omega 3 fatty acids DHA and EPA balanced with Omega 9 found in avocados and a little Omega 6 found in extra virgin olive oil. Or maybe you need a swig of Kyolic liquid aged garlic to get rid of the H. pylori in your stomach that is giving you acid reflux.

Only you know when you ask the right questions of your physician, and then get a second opinion from someone trained in complementary, alternative, integrative, and preventive medicine. The answer is out there. You need to find out all the possibilities existing right now to help you override any genetic variations that can be helped with nutrition or lifestyle changes.

Read the latest findings on why you need more (and how much) vitamin D3 to prevent heart disease, calcifications, autoimmune chronic diseases, diabetes, and recurrent infections. See the article, Dobnig, H. " Independent association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality," Archives of Internal Medicine, 168; 12:1330-49, 2008.

Many nutritionists recommend about 1,000 mgs daily, but the dose you take is up to you and your consultation with your own doctor. But be aware of what is written and researched out there and find out how it applies to you as an individual because we all have different needs and many variations in our genes. When you change your diet, do you change your genes?

How do you switch on the good genes and switch off the bad genes when you change your foods? Epigentics and nutrigenomics are fields of study that look at how your body switches the tags on genes on or off. When you're looking for hope, start by looking for validation. It works.

One in eight people in the U.S.A has at least two of the conditions that pose a serious risk leading to heart disease.

According to the April 26, 2010 Los Angeles Times article by Thomas H. Maugh II, "Nearly Half in U.S. have heart disease risks," high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes are plaguing Americans, according to the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This article also appears in the April 27, 2010 Sacramento Bee on the front page under "Health." See the L.A. Times article of April 26, 2010, The Heart Disease Trifecta.

Is it the food Americans eat, a sedentary lifestyle, or a perfectionist boss or spouse that creates the symptoms that lead to heart disease? Or is it 70 percent lifestyle and 30 percent genetic? See the April 27, 2010 article "Paging Dr. Gupta," CNN, Heart disease risk heightened in nearly half of Americans.

One out of eight adults, or 13 percent, have two of these conditions, and 3 percent have all three, the CDC said in its analysis of people over 20 years old from 1999 to 2006. Forty-five percent have at least one of the three. Is the cause based on how individuals perceive stress? Some people suffer more stress than others under the same environment or even under the same diet.

Why do African American individuals have a greater likelihood of having at least one of these three conditions than non-Hispanic white people and Mexican Americans, according to the latest CDC study? White Americans more commonly have higher cholesterol than African Americans and Mexican Americans. As for diabetes, African Americans and Mexican Americans have a higher prevalence than white individuals.

Can work-related stress seriously affect your health?

Listening to the reviews of former employees sometimes helps if there are large numbers of former employees with the same conclusion about a specific boss's personality. Should bosses get reviewed online in the same manner as certain professors? It's how you perceive your boss or work environment or even co-workers that controls how you experience stress and how it may affect your health.

It's a controversial issue with legal ramifications that's open to defamation of character if former employees review their bosses like some people review films, books, or plays online. On one hand it's an opinion. On the other hand, it's defamation if the boss loses his job, clients, or business resulting in loss of income, home, and family. It's a very touchy question. Should a boss that 'gave' people heart disease be reviewed online? It's one person's opinion with no proof.

Again, it's a controversial issue with legal ramifications. Can someone 'give' you heart disease? Or is it how you perceive the stress caused by that person that gives you the heart disease risks such as high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, or type 2 diabetes? And is how you perceive and experience stress genetic or learned from your early childhood experiences?

Most people know about the books on the market on reversing heart disease risks by changing diet and activities, such as more vegetables and fruits, more green juices from fresh vegetables such as the leafy greens, more raw plant foods, some supplements, and dark purple, red, and orange fruits such as blueberries and blackberries, even dried goji berries.

Fish oil and your telomere size

Other books tout fish oil to increase the length of your cells' telomeres and balance your omega 3 fatty acids with your omega 6 and omega 9 fatty acids. See the April 18, 2010 Sacramento Bee article, Integrative Medicine: Yet another strong hook for fish oil.

According to that article, eating oily fish like salmon or taking fish-oil supplements can lower blood triglycerides, raise HDL ("good") cholesterol, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation, protect you from heart disease risks, and improve your mood.

Studies focus on how fish oil helps slow the process of macular degeneration in the elderly. Fish oil may also be beneficial in preventing cancer. According to the Sacramento Bee article, Integrative Medicine: Yet another strong hook for fish oil, the latest studies suggest that one of the ways fish oils keep us healthy is by protecting the parts of our chromosomes known as telomeres.

Some worry that fish oil may increase the stroke rate about 5%. The best way to find out more information is to see whether your blood type, blood thickness, or thin blood predisposes you to any risk. For example, if your blood is already thin, how much more will fish oil thin your blood?

Telomeres are caps of genetic material on the ends of our chromosomes

If your telomeres are longer, you can bet they can mark the youthful quality of your cells. The longer the telomere, the healthier the cell. Every time one of our cells divides, a small portion of that telomere is lost. Eventually, telomere shrinkage leads to cell aging and death.

So you want to increase the length of your telomeres or at least slow down the shortening process. Fish oil helps here and so does to a degree, resveratrol or resveratrol combined with blueberry extract, called pterostilbene. But it's fish oil being studied in the research mentioned in the Sacramento Bee article, Integrative Medicine: Yet another strong hook for fish oil as to how omega 3 fatty acids from fish oil help to keep the telomeres from shrinking.

Only the incidence of heart disease risks may not be caused by only nutritional deficiencies or a sedentary lifestyle. There may be another factor--working for a perfectionist boss or a bully boss or living with a spouse or other relatives or friends that are perfectionists or bullies.

How can you help yourself to override your bad gene variations?

Whatever gets rid of all that plastic in our bodies. It's glutathione (Recancostat) because it binds to some toxic chemicals in your body and flushes them into your liver, gall bladder, and colon, finally removing them from your body.

Plastics show up 10,000 times more than other pollutants in our bodies, even more than heavy metals. And there's a pathway that rids your body of plastics. Your body makes glucuronic acid that catches nasty chemicals like glutathione, where they end up in your color or urine and are eliminated as waste.

Intestinal enzymes can force you to re-absorb toxic chemicals back into your body

These are some ways to override bad stuff. But look out for enzymes made by your intestines that force you to re-absorb toxic chemicals back into your body. Guess what makes these enzymes in your gut? It's red meat eaten in large quantities or in diets that constantly emphasize red meat, especially char-broiled red meat.

This enzyme made by your gut after you eat lots of red meat is called beta-glucuronidase. So now you need a safety net, and your body makes D-glucaraic acid that stops your enzyme called B-glucuronidase from putting toxic chemicals back into your bloodstream.

The information on this you'll find in a lot greater detail in Total Wellness newsletter, April 2009. But the point of this is that there are nutrients and foods out there that are simple, wholesome, and cost-efficient that have the ability to override a lot of your bad genes and reduce the risk in them at least while you're eating right.

Your health care professional can let you know whether you need vitamin B12 or a multiple vitamin in a sublingual form you can absorb better as you age, or whole foods, or maybe CO-Q10 or magnesium, or even Omega 3 fatty acids DHA and EPA balanced with Omega 9 found in avocados and a little Omega 6 found in extra virgin olive oil. Or maybe you need a swig of Kyolic liquid aged garlic to get rid of the H. pylori in your stomach that is giving you acid reflux.

Only you know when you ask the right questions of your physician, and then get a second opinion from someone trained in complementary, alternative, integrative, and preventive medicine. The answer is out there. You need to find out all the possibilities existing right now to help you override any genetic variations that can be helped with nutrition or lifestyle changes.

Read the latest findings on why you need more (and how much) vitamin D3 to prevent heart disease, calcifications, autoimmune chronic diseases, diabetes, and recurrent infections. See the article, Dobnig, H. " Independent association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality," Archives of Internal Medicine, 168; 12:1330-49, 2008.

Many nutritionists recommend about 1,000 mgs daily, but the dose you take is up to you and your consultation with your own doctor. But be aware of what is written and researched out there and find out how it applies to you as an individual because we all have different needs and many variations in our genes. When you change your diet, do you change your genes?

How do you switch on the good genes and switch off the bad genes when you change your foods? Epigentics and nutrigenomics are fields of study that look at how your body switches the tags on genes on or off. When you're looking for hope, start by looking for validation. It works.

One in eight people in the U.S.A has at least two of the conditions that pose a serious risk leading to heart disease.

According to the April 26, 2010 Los Angeles Times article by Thomas H. Maugh II, "Nearly Half in U.S. have heart disease risks," high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes are plaguing Americans, according to the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This article also appears in the April 27, 2010 Sacramento Bee on the front page under "Health." See the L.A. Times article of April 26, 2010, The Heart Disease Trifecta.

Is it the food Americans eat, a sedentary lifestyle, or a perfectionist boss or spouse that creates the symptoms that lead to heart disease? Or is it 70 percent lifestyle and 30 percent genetic? See the April 27, 2010 article "Paging Dr. Gupta," CNN, Heart disease risk heightened in nearly half of Americans.

One out of eight adults, or 13 percent, have two of these conditions, and 3 percent have all three, the CDC said in its analysis of people over 20 years old from 1999 to 2006. Forty-five percent have at least one of the three. Is the cause based on how individuals perceive stress? Some people suffer more stress than others under the same environment or even under the same diet.

Why do African American individuals have a greater likelihood of having at least one of these three conditions than non-Hispanic white people and Mexican Americans, according to the latest CDC study? White Americans more commonly have higher cholesterol than African Americans and Mexican Americans. As for diabetes, African Americans and Mexican Americans have a higher prevalence than white individuals.

Can work-related stress seriously affect your health?

Listening to the reviews of former employees sometimes helps if there are large numbers of former employees with the same conclusion about a specific boss's personality. Should bosses get reviewed online in the same manner as certain professors? It's how you perceive your boss or work environment or even co-workers that controls how you experience stress and how it may affect your health.

It's a controversial issue with legal ramifications that's open to defamation of character if former employees review their bosses like some people review films, books, or plays online. On one hand it's an opinion. On the other hand, it's defamation if the boss loses his job, clients, or business resulting in loss of income, home, and family. It's a very touchy question. Should a boss that 'gave' people heart disease be reviewed online? It's one person's opinion with no proof.

Again, it's a controversial issue with legal ramifications. Can someone 'give' you heart disease? Or is it how you perceive the stress caused by that person that gives you the heart disease risks such as high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, or type 2 diabetes? And is how you perceive and experience stress genetic or learned from your early childhood experiences?

Most people know about the books on the market on reversing heart disease risks by changing diet and activities, such as more vegetables and fruits, more green juices from fresh vegetables such as the leafy greens, more raw plant foods, some supplements, and dark purple, red, and orange fruits such as blueberries and blackberries, even dried goji berries.

Other books tout fish oil to increase the length of your cells' telomeres and balance your omega 3 fatty acids with your omega 6 and omega 9 fatty acids. See the April 18, 2010 Sacramento Bee article, Integrative Medicine: Yet another strong hook for fish oil. According to that article, eating oily fish like salmon or taking fish-oil supplements can lower blood triglycerides, raise HDL ("good") cholesterol, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation, protect you from heart disease risks, and improve your mood.

Studies focus on how fish oil helps slow the process of macular degeneration in the elderly. Fish oil may also be beneficial in preventing cancer. According to the Sacramento Bee article, Integrative Medicine: Yet another strong hook for fish oil, the latest studies suggest that one of the ways fish oils keep us healthy is by protecting the parts of our chromosomes known as telomeres.

Telomeres are caps of genetic material on the ends of our chromosomes

If your telomeres are longer, you can bet they can mark the youthful quality of your cells. The longer the telomere, the healthier the cell. Every time one of our cells divides, a small portion of that telomere is lost. Eventually, telomere shrinkage leads to cell aging and death.

So you want to increase the length of your telomeres or at least slow down the shortening process. Fish oil helps here and so does to a degree, resveratrol or resveratrol combined with blueberry extract, called pterostilbene. But it's fish oil being studied in the research mentioned in the Sacramento Bee article, Integrative Medicine: Yet another strong hook for fish oil as to how omega 3 fatty acids from fish oil help to keep the telomeres from shrinking.

Can a perfectionist boss give you heart disease risk symptoms--high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes?

With the unemployment rate in Sacramento, do you really have to take any job to make ends meet? Or do you have a choice between working for a perfectionist if the job spells more security--or selling online?

On the other hand, living for 30 or 40 years in an unhappy marriage to a perfectionist, controlling individual, or a bully also can have the same effects even if you don't work outside the home. Double that--working for a perfectionist boss and coming home to a controlling partner that you're dependent upon financially or emotionally increases the risk for heart conditions even more, according to studies.

See the articles, Toxic marriage may hurt your heart - Heart health- msnbc.com, and Bad Marriage, Bad Heart? - CBS News. These articles note that negative relationships boost your Heart disease risk by 34 Percent, according to studies mentioned in those articles. Bad marriages can cause heart disease and raise your blood pressure--permanently. See Bad Marriage Affects Women's Health | Care2 Healthy & Green Living.

You have studies looking at the quality of marriage and heart disease. You also have the problem of working for a perfectionist or bully boss. Look at the quality of your work life and compare it to the quality of your home life. Which is better? Are they similar? The answer can give you a clue to why you have high blood pressure or heart disease risks.

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