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Some people never leave high school mentally

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Baby boomers, do you know someone that you have known since high school, and for some reason or another appear to have never left high school. In the reality shows that are watched every day you see similar behaviors you see in teenagers in high school. You see the alliances, we called these clichés in high school, and you see the dividing of the group and even the bullying of one member in order to vote one person of the show. The interesting thing about why mature adults act like high school teenagers is because some of us never leave truly leave high school mentally.

This is a fascinating fact of psychology and since it has a lot of focus on childhood and adolescent school years, high school shaped our view of the social world. Not everyone feels the sustained, melancholic presence of a high-school shadow self. There are some people who simply put in their four years, graduate, and that’s that. But for most of us adults, the adolescent years occupy a privileged place in our memories. In other words finished high school and left it behind in the past. High school was to prepare us for life. The isolation, the shame, the bullying and so forth was to prepare us to cope for the real world. This is also true of today’s society; we live in an age when our reputation is at the mercy of people we barely know. Unfortunately this is exactly how it was in high school.

High school was where we learned to cope with social relationships. It was where we learn how to conform or not conform. That is why many individuals chose to revisit their high-school years. In addition, why the football players when confronted with someone from high school still acts like they own the world, and the beautiful girls who are still beautiful use their looks and luck, but at this stage in life are little more unsure about life and things. Furthermore, with the introduction of Facebook social ties that would have gone dormant are now always accessible over time and all the time.

Our teenage years are tremendously important and influential in developing who we are. It's the time we become adults and our brains rewire themselves to give us a sense of adult identity. It's also the time we learn our place among other people in the world, explore what to do with our lives, and begin mate selection. There was a time when these changes would occur in the environment of the larger world, among family and community. Unfortunately in the last century with the expansion of the role of education, teenagers spend more hours with their peers then interacting with adults. In addition, the increase interaction with teenagers that are just as clueless is like throwing the teenagers into the coliseum to fight the lions. This is where cliques and hierarchies are determined by uninformed standards such as athletic prowess, looks, or family wealth. These standards continue into adult life with advertising, athletes and celebrities. The experiences of high school can continue into adult life and create an individual that did not leave high school mentally.

http://nymag.com/news/features/high-school-2013-1/index5.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/05/opinion/dowd-high-school-maniacal.html?_r=0

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