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Solar farm kills birds and insects

Solar farm kills birds and insects
Solar farm kills birds and insects
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Many people want to go “green” and not rely on fossil fuels for energy. However, what is the cost to our environment? What the news media has yet to report on a large scale, are the thousands of birds, butterflies, other insects and animals that are killed by our attempts to go “green” and use alternate energy sources.

The Ivanpah solar farm in California which has not been in operation for long, is already responsible for the death of thousands of birds and insects who are roasted alive as they fly over the1000° F temperatures that radiate from the solar panels. It is yet to be determined what the ripple effect of this will be. If there are not enough insects, will those creatures that rely on them for food die? Or the plants that rely on them for pollination cease to exist or become endangered? Or, is it possible that there will be so few birds left in that area that the remaining insects will flourish causing widespread damage? With over five miles of solar panels in one area reflecting 1000 °F of heat into the atmosphere daily, how will that affect the weather? One can only speculate what the results will be when the natural balance of nature is destroyed. Windmills are not a solution either, because they kill over 100,000 birds a year as well.

With today’s emission control and the United States having a huge reserve of natural fuels one can only wonder if we would have been kinder to the environment by sticking with our natural resources until an alternate method for generating power was developed that would not kill our wildlife.

For more information go to:

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304703804579379230641329484

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-many-birds-do-wind-turbines-really-kill-180948154/?no-ist

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2463148/U-S-overtakeS-Saudi-Arabia-worlds-biggest-oil-producer-jump-output-shale.html