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Shaky Ukraine is more vulnerable to Russia

Do you know that Vladimir Putin is very popular in Russia. His popularity probably extends to the ethnic Russians in the Ukraine too. Yet, having witnessed Putins autocratic style and the disrespectful nature of Russians and Russian separatists, one has to wonder about Russian citizens. It makes it more difficult to have compassion for them as they face sanctions for which they have brought this on themselves.

Ukraine appears bleak
Etienne De Malglaive / Getty Images,

Now, today’s news is that the Ukraine Prime Minister has resigned because parliament would not support his direction to reduce economic dependency on Russia. That is most discouraging. Such actions by the Ukraine parliament make it more difficult for Americans to support them.

“Ukrainian Prime Minister Yatsenyuk announces resignation”

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2014/07/24/ukrainian-prime-minister-yatsenyuk-to-resign/

Sherrod Brown, Senator from Ohio opposes sending American natural gas to the Ukraine or anywhere else in Europe because he argues that cheap fuel in America should translate into more manufacturing jobs in the U.S. resulting from economic cost advantage. That makes sense.

So, while most believed that President Obama was playing chess and not checkers, right now, he is loafing in California while his inbox is overflowing. He can’t blame that on Congress.

Secretary Kerry’s plate is full, too full. His problem is that he hasn’t hired enough high level staff to help him. The Obama administration is running on short staff.

Right now, the US should have a high level full time ambassador engaged in the Ukraine. Who is that? Geoffry R. Pyatt is the ambassador.

Looking at his resume, he doesn’t have deep knowledge of Russia, the Ukraine and Europe because his experience is in Latin America. If it was in Central America, one might wonder how effective was that?

His credentials and experience are too lightweight for the present conditions. We need an upgrade here. There are a host of available and highly qualified individuals for this job, the appointment should be based on qualifications and not politics.

“Geoffrey R. Pyatt, a Senior Foreign Service officer, arrived in Kyiv on August 3, 2013 as the eighth United States Ambassador to Ukraine. His 24 year State Department career has ranged from Asia to Europe and Latin America.

From May 2010 until July 2013, he was Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the South and Central Asia Affairs Bureau, leading the State Department’s newest geographic bureau and helping to manage U.S. relations in a region that stretches from Kazakhstan to the Indian Ocean.

From August 2007 until May 2010, he was Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Mission to International Organizations in Vienna, representing the United States to the International Atomic Energy Agency and other UN technical agencies.

From 2002 to 2007 Ambassador Pyatt served at the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi, first as Minister Counselor for Political Affairs and beginning in June 2006 as Deputy Chief of Mission (DCM). As DCM he served as chief operating officer for one of the United States' largest and fastest growing foreign missions.

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Ambassador Pyatt grew up in La Jolla, California and holds a Master's degree in International Relations from Yale and B.A. in Political Science from the University of California, Irvine. He and his wife Mary have two children, William and Claire.”

http://ukraine.usembassy.gov/about-us/ambassador.html