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Seeing an ice sculpture and photographing it.

This headless sculpture of a human form in the Darby Creek stirs the imagination.
This headless sculpture of a human form in the Darby Creek stirs the imagination.
Photo by Bill McCracken

Finding and capturing shapes in ice using design elements of shape, form, texture, and lines.
This image is one of several in a series about abstract photography in ice. These shapes can be found after the water freezes over and then refreezes. Chunks of ice that do not completely melt have smooth edges and refreeze into unique shapes. Often they produce unique abstract shapes as they refreeze in their environment.
Abstract images need the design elements of shape, form, texture, and lines. The overall shape of this image is like a headless Greek god, or perhaps a spear thrower in mid stride. The shape brings an otherwise cold piece of ice alive. The curved lines produce a sensual feeling that keep drawing you into it. The surface texture is created by all of the trapped air bubbles and cracks in the ice.
The background is the creek bed filled with small rocks distorted by the water. The colors are warm earth tones contrasted against the blue ice of the sculpture. The rest of the ice is non descript and it does not distract from the background. It does give the subject a place to come from and is connected.
The camera was set up on a tripod and tilted straight down. The goal was to have the focal plane of the camera parallel with the surface of the ice. The aperture is set at f/9.0 and at this distance the focus depth is enough to capture all of the ice shape. This is set up on the shore looking down into the shallow stream below. The exposure settings are Aperture f/9.0, shutter speed 1/60 sec, and white balance at sunny day. The lens is a 70-300 mm set at 112 mm. The exposure program is set on manual.
http://photoshoptutorials.ws/photoshop-tutorials/photo-retouching/white-balance/page-2.html
http://veerle.duoh.com/blog/comments/pro_sharpening_in_photoshop_cs3_using_smart_filters/
mailto:wlmccracken06@yahoo.com?subject=rule of thirds
http://photoinf.com/general/kodak/guidelines_for_better_photographic_composition_rule_of_thirds.html
 

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