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Scenes in eloquent depictions

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Literary fiction has intrinsic attributes to it's nature. The major quality being a theme conveying what the story is about. Another is it's figurative language, for a heightened meaning. This form of literary writing is sometimes referred to as lyrical or layered, and has a rhythm. The attention on the main themes of the story, assists with creating and developing interesting characters, for engaging and involving the reader.

"When I think of the word 'literary', I envision writing that is entirely memorable, vivid, and original," says Veronica Ross, fiction editor of The Antigonish Review. "The language is wonderful. The story can be quite simple, but it will impart a certain feeling when you read it. A feeling of joy, of surprise perhaps. There is nothing predictable about these 'literary' stories. The voice is big", notes writingworld.com.

Pulitzer Prize and Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison, is known for writing majestic themes, picturesque dialogue, and richly layered characters. In her novel, Song of Solomon, she uses the symbol of a peacock’s tail as a temporary display of beauty in comparison to the promise of luxury.

  • "Life, safety, and luxury fanned out before him like the tail-spread of a peacock, and as he stood there trying to distinguish each delicious color, he saw the dusty boots of his father standing just on the other side of the shallow pit."(Song of Solomon, Toni Morrison)

Robert Frost, received four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry and the Congressional Gold Medal for Poetry. He is revered for his realistic illustrations of rural life and detailed themes. Rhythmic language is represented in his poem, Nothing Gold Can Stay. It starts off talking about nature, with 'green is gold.' This takes the idea that green is the color we see nature as, and then shows that at the beginning of spring, nature is more gold in color than green:

Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf,
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day
Nothing gold can stay.

All language can be figurative. When writing about daily moments and events, comparisons and symbols most often are used. Figurative language shapes meaning and can astonish you. It can allow for experiencing places, people, and events around you.

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