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Saxon Math a solid choice for homeschool students and parents

There are many choices when it comes to homeschool math curriculum choices. Some parents who struggle through school in this subject area find the choices too overwhelming.

In Mankato we have access to Mathnasium, a specialized program aimed at helping reluctant math students. There is a fee and the consideration of time, but some families do find the payoff to be well worth the investments. Students work with tutors in specialized sessions aimed at buidling confidence and skills.

For parents who are more ambivalent when it comes to math, there are wonderful curriculum packages available. Saxon math offers comprehensive curriculum packages for homeschooling families. They even come with scripted guides for the younger grades where parents are given every word to say.

These programs can be time consuming and expensive, but are generally worth the effort. As I have moved through many grades of Saxon I have found that just like anything in life, you get out what you put in to it. It is probably very reasonable to teach math without formal curriculum packages before 3rd or 4th grade, but beyond that it can be difficult to encompass all of the topics adequately.

Children who are not able to sit for longer periods of time or write extensively might find the early Saxon grades too challenging or repetitive. Many of the activities in Saxon can be done orally with the child, saving prep time and paper. Children might get bored at the early grades with one book for the year, so smaller workbooks on varieties of topics might be more appropriate and engaging.

The manipulatives required by Saxon can also be altered to use what is available within the home, saving money for the family and avoiding supply overload on the bookshelves. We used a clock manipulative that we made from paper and brad fasteners.

For the math wary (or weary), Saxon can be as beneficial to the homeschool parent as it is to the student. Parents know that the topics taught are relevant and thorough, even if they don't know what the Cartesian coordinate system is. As with so many things in homeschooling, if you didn't learn it before, you will know it well by the time you help your child learn about it.

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