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SATW Traveling Teddy Elizabeth lassos Wild West adventures in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Elizabeth the SATW Traveling Teddy enjoyed a wild time in the ol’ town of Tulsa, Okla. She was lucky enough to meet Indians, African-Americans and whites who make Oklahoma such a rich cultural mix.

Elizabeth with 4-year-old Cochehe Mashunkashey, an Osage Indian who was part of a drumming circle at Post Oak Lodge.
Betsa Marsh
SATW Traveling Teddy Elizabeth with Osage Indian dancers Norris Bighorse, left, and Mason Bighorse at Post Oak Lodge.
Betsa Marsh

Elizabeth travels for the third-grade class of Meredith Schroeder at St. Joseph Consolidated School in Hamilton, Ohio, and the kindergarten class of Barbara Hill at Crawford Street Playschool in Vicksburg, Miss.

The Traveling Teddy program is a geographic outreach program of the Society of American Travel Writers. As ambassadors for school classes in the U.S. and Canada, the Traveling Teddies explore the globe with SATW professionals and send home postcards, souvenirs and blog posts to help the students discover the world beyond their classrooms.

While visiting the Cherokee in Tahlequah, Elizabeth was lucky enough to spot world-famous artist Murv Jacobs working in his storefront studio downtown. He was a good sport to introduce one of his bears to Elizabeth, face to face!

In Tulsa, Elizabeth also popped in to watch potter Linda Rimstidt Coward paint a vase in her studio in the Atlas Building downtown.

Elizabeth had been told to look for the bits of famous Rt. 66 that still exist through Tulsa, and traveled out one day with Michael Wallis, the author of Route 66: The Mother Road. She posed beneath the famous Meadow Gold neon sign, atop a huge Rt. 66 road marker, and got to nibble on Rt. 66 cookies prepared by Merritt’s Bakery and served at The Campbell Hotel.

To unwind from all her touring, Elizabeth and SATW group went to the Dust Bowl Lanes, for a bit of ‘70s retro bowling. They dined on tater tots and rolled strikes!

When you go

Tulsa and Oklahoma.