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Santa Fe Indian Market update and IFAM

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It’s the exciting weekend in Santa Fe again, when dazzling Native American artists in their booths, and their admirers come together in an art-buying frenzy…but it’s also an exciting time in the streets, with so many interesting people from all over the world in town. Galleries are open late, restaurants are jammed, and people like me are going in and out of the fancy hotels around the plaza, paying house calls. It’ll be an early night for many, though, who get up at the crack of dawn to buy from their favorite artists.

2014 is the inaugural year of I.F.A.M., the Indigenous Fine Art Market, a group that broke off from the traditional plaza event to do their own thing. It’s on for one more day, Saturday, at the Railyard Park and pavilion. There are about 250 artists from all over, but the park venue is much hipper and nicer than the traditional plaza. Within earshot on the bandstand is an all-day line-up of Native American entertainers, musicians, and dancers, and of course, the smell of frybread is in the air.

Today at IFAM I pulled away from shopping to listen to a storyteller tell a profound little tale about how a rabbit got its ears (learning used to be so much more fun!), and dug a new kind of hybrid powwow/hip-hop/reggae dance music. The park was so alive with new art and culture and the unique things people brought, it’s another terrific addition to Santa Fe, like the International Folk Art Market. I’m not through shopping yet at IFAM, and like all beginning markets, the prices are good.

Tonight’s like a full moon, the coyotes are howling on the East Side and I hardly ever hear them anymore. Santa Fe has its full-on mojo going and I think that means the money will be flowing...people are really looking forward to a good time and a good market.

Tomorrow night is the Santa Fe Powwow from 5:00 to 10:30 at Genoveva Chavez Center, another chance to hear great music and probably see Native Americans dance who are visiting the area.

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