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Russian bombers appeared off of California and Alaska

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Tensions between Russia and the United States have continued to remain tense in the aftermath of the Russian annexation of Crimea. In response to harsh criticisms about the Crimea affair from the Obama administration Russia has been demonstrating its military power across the world. Pentagon officials said on Monday NORAD scrambled fighters against Russian bombers off the Alaska and northern California coasts reported DOD Buzz on June 12, 2014.

In response to the appearance of a fleet of Russian bombers off the Alaska and northern California coasts Northern Command scrambled two F-22 Raptor and two F-15 Eagle fighters. There were four long-range Tu-95 Bear bombers and a refueling aircraft among the Russian planes. The Russian planes briefly entered the U.S. Air Defense Identification Zone off Alaska. The ADIZ is recognized as extending about 200 miles off the coast while “sovereign airspace” is seen as extending 12 nautical miles from land. The Russian planes did not come near U.S. sovereign airspace.

Russian strategic bombers flew within 50 miles of California coast reports The Washington Free Beacon. U.S. air defense systems were triggered this week when four Russian strategic bombers conducted practice bombing runs near Alaska and California. Navy Captain Jeff Davis said these Russian incursions began Monday around 4:30 p.m. Pacific time at which time radar detected the four turbo-prop powered bombers approaching the U.S. air defense zone located near the far western Aleutian Islands. The Russian planes were intercepted over the Aleutians by two U.S. Air Force F-22 jets.

This bomber incursion is the most recent Russian nuclear saber-rattling since relations between Moscow and Washington began to worsen after Russia’s military annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea. Clearly, caution should be taken in dealing with the highly sensitive state of Russian relations with the United States at this time. A literal war between the two nuclear superpowers would clearly not be in anyone's best interests.

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