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Roswell man $43,000 credit: Massive bank mistake, big spender wrongly cashes all

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A Roswell man got a $43,000 credit forwarded to his local bank account, but the catch of the story is that the individual never deposited the money there himself. Apparently a massive bank mistake resulted in the lump sum being credited to the man’s name, even though he actually only checked in $430 (those additional two zeroes makes quite a difference). The big spender decided to wrongly cash the error in, quickly using all of the money, but 11 Alive News reveals this Wednesday, July 2, 2014, that the bank now wants that improperly placed dough back.

A Washington Federal Branch bank in New Mexico is now taking legal action against a member pending a major financial blunder. This “Roswell man $43,000 credit” scandal began to trend across national news headlines this week after it was revealed that one big spender from Roswell squandered a lot of money that wasn’t his to begin with. Police officials are saying that the unbelievable fiscal incident began back in late November of 2013 and has only now reached the public spotlight.

The man in question, whose identity has not been disclosed by either the bank or law enforcement authorities in the pending lawsuit, apparently deposited a check for $430 last year at his local bank. Imagine his surprise when he discovered that a massive bank mistake resulted in him actually getting credit for a much heftier $43,000 instead. Police are confirming that this is what actually occurred, and everything could have been solved then and there had the individual been honest and simply warned the bank of the error.

However, this serious inaccuracy turned into a major problem when the Roswell man decided to spend the $43,000 — all of the cash, leaving not even a penny behind — instead of notifying the Washington Federal Branch bank. Less than two weeks later, the bank learned of the unexpected miscalculation, and requested that the man return the wrongfully credited money. Upon learning that he had spent it, they demanded that he repay the “stolen” amount back.

Since the November incident, says KOB News, the big spender who refuses to acknowledge his misconduct has kept a low profile. The bank has allegedly attempted to contact the Roswell man over the $43,000 credit on numerous occasions, but he is forestalling returning their calls. Police were eventually phoned in as well, but the individual still hasn’t repaid a dime from the cash sum he spent out of his account. As of this June 2014, the New Mexico bank is finally turning to its final alternative — taking aggressive legal action against the man.

It is currently being decided by the local district attorney whether the case will be prosecuted in terms of criminal charges or a civil court lawsuit to get the thousands of dollars back. Although some people who have weighed in on the controversy believe that the man had a right to spend the money because the huge error was originally the bank’s fault, but most feel he needs to be held responsible for wrongly cashing in the ill-begotten sum.

“I believe he should pay it back, you know it’s the only right thing to do because it costs the bank money, it costs me money, it costs you money,” said one official.

What is your response to the trending Roswell man $43,000 credit error? Do you believe that the bank should be held responsible for the massive mistake and simply accept the loss? Or, as the Washington Federal Branch is asserting, the man in question wrongly spent the money and should now have to pay the considerable sum that wasn’t his in the first place? No comments have been given by the bank yet.

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