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Responsibility in Autism

There is no mistaking that parents of children with autism, asperger's, or any other name associated with this complicated developmental disorder feel overwhelmed. Every child is different of course in what they are good at and what they struggle with. Some parents describe their autistic children as really good students but not so good at controlling their impulsive behaviors. Other parents will tell you that their children struggle in school while their behavior is not a problem at all. To learn more, visit the Mayo Clinic's website at http://mayoclinic.com/health/aspergers-syndrome/DS00551 .

Either way, it would be an understatement to say parents are concerned about their children and what their future holds. All parents worry, but for autism parents, the worries are of a much different nature.That being said, like most things, people tend to focus on the negatives. However, the positive and good attributes of this condition need to be mentioned than they are presently.

These children have so much to give and so many lessons to teach the general public. They are compassionate, loving, giving, and some of the hardest workers you will find. Think about what autistic children must face in a day! They not only endure overwhelming stimuli and judgements each and every day at school and still expected to do what an average child can do; many autistic children do so without griping and complaining. They may feel frustrated and want to give up; but the fact is they work extra hard just to fit in and to keep away any negative attention.

The adults in the lives of children who have some form of autism have a responsibility to learn as much as they can if they want to have a positive impact on the their development. If you do not have a child with autism, you may count yourself lucky. The truth is, though, you too have the responsibility to learn and teach your own children how to treat their peers. It is perfectly normal and wonderful to be different, whether there is a label for it or not.

That is one area most children with autism do get naturally. They know they are different and that actually helps them be more accepting of others. Compassion is a very important trait to have and hopefully one day everyone will learn what it is and how to put it to use. Today, children all over the world who have some form of disability already know what it is and will grow up to become exceptional adults because of it. 

Pervasive Developmental Disorders are very much real and can be explained best through the eyes of someone affected by it.  Thankfully this topic is being discussed more and support is out there.

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