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Research on autism diet

This is the beginning of a series of articles that will explore in-depth the autism diet, the research, and the success or lack thereof. First, a discussion on the autism diet and what it entails. This is an intensive gluten, dairy, casein free diet. Products such as breads, baked goods, pizza, cereals and cookies all contain gluten. Milk and milk products such as cheese, ice cream and yogurt contain casein. Some research claims by removing these foods from the diet, autism can be improved or even cured.


Research also claims that autistic individuals are more likely to suffer from digestive problems. Research appears to both contradict and support this idea. On the one hand, there is no conclusive evidence showing that digestive problems are more common in autistic children. On the other hand, some research shows how proteins leak from the intestine into the blood system and is common among autistic individuals.


The concern is a proper balanced diet and maintaining that balance while following an autistic diet. There is no conclusive evidence that this diet cures autism and the question becomes, “Is autism curable?”
Autism is a neurological disorder and increasingly diagnosed with brain scans. Physically the autistic brain has a larger amygdale, which controls emotions, autistic brains are larger, and the social area of the brain is smaller. How do dietary changes affect a physically different brain? Is it possible that those with food and environmental sensitivities diagnosed with autism are in fact simply environmental and food sensitive?

Thus on a diet and by controlling the environment it can look like a “cure” for autism.
Some research links environmental factors such as lead, ethyl alcohol, and methyl mercury to the rising cases of autism. There is no conclusive evidence to this research, which suggests these factors are increasing the cases of autism. Again, is it possible these environmental sensitive people are in fact not autistic at all? Over the next few weeks, this topic will explore this possibility.

Autism Resources in Montreal
http://www.autismcentral.ca/research/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=52
 

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