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Republicans tend to be the most religious people in America, according to Gallup

Gallup chart on religion and political party affiliation
Gallup chart on religion and political party affiliation
Gallup.com

The relationship between religion and one’s political party affiliation definitely shows that Americans who are very religious are more likely to identify with the Republican Party – or lean politically to the right – than they are to identify with the Democratic Party – or lean politically to the left, according to a new Gallup poll released and reported upon by UPI on Monday. According to the poll, this has been the case for nearly seven years now. People who are nonreligious or only moderately religious identify with the Democratic Party – or lean politically to the left.

In the poll, Gallup has classified persons as being “very religious” if they assert religion is an important part of their daily lives and that they attend religious services every week – or almost every week. That “very religious” group makes up 41 percent of all United States adults during the first six months of 2014. The “nonreligious” group of Americans makes up 30 percent of Americans during the first six months of this year. The persons in this group say that religion is not an important part of their daily lives and that they rarely or never attend religious services.

There is a reaming group comprising 29 percent of the population. That group classifies themselves as “moderately religious.” They claim that religion is important in their lives but they also say that they do not attend religious services regularly. Or, people in this “moderately religious” group say that religion is not really important to them but they still attend religious services.

Nonreligious Americans have been the most Democratic of the three defined religious groups from 2008 to 2014. On the scale, they have a net Democratic value ranging between +38 and +19. The moderates have a Democratic value ranging from +23 to +1. The very religious group has net values in the negative range. That obviously means that the very religious group leans to the right and are Republicans.

In a comparative summary, all three groups were more Democratic and less Republican in 2008 than they are now. This designates a decline in the Democratic edge the country’s electorate had six years ago. Times have changed, and a Democratic-leaning society is no longer present.

Regarding the nonreligious Americans, 29 percent are Republican, 15 percent are Independent, and 52 percent are Democratic. Regarding the moderately religious Americans, 38 percent are Republican, 14 percent are Independent, and 44 percent are Democrat. Regarding the very religious Americans, 49 percent are Republican, 11 percent are Independent, and 36 percent are Democrat. Basically, half of the very religious Americans are Republican and half of the nonreligious Americans are Democrat.

By far, the subgroups that stand out the most in the poll are very religious white Americans and black Americans. Sixty-four percent of white Americans who are very religious are Republican. Seventy-seven percent of black Americans who are very religious are Democrat. Most very religious Hispanics, 46 percent, are Independent while most very religious Asian Americans – 50 percent of them – are Independent. The Gallup poll involved interviews with 30,000 people per month from 2008 to 2012 and with 15,000 people per month from 2013 to 2014.