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Recruiting volunteers not raising our taxes

It is time for all those fun activities we can share with our FFBF. It is also time to recognize our neighbors and their FFBF, for community service. These are a great ways to one showcase the volunteers in our communities who keep it running smoothly, and teach Altruism. Our pets will provide all the help they are possibly able to if only we the stewards of their lives acknowledge them.

Dogs, cats, rabbits and so forth have always been the worker animal when there was first farming, the industrial age and now the digital age. We just don’t always see what is happening right under our noses – so to speak. We all hear of the policing animals, the military working animals, some about the service animals and so forth. However, do we hear enough? It seems that we hear more about the bad in the world than the good. And this could never be truer than, when we look at service animals. Recently a YouTube.com video of a dog attacking a little boy in his own yard went viral. The family cat defended the little boy and ran the dog off. This is a true story which is important to bring awareness to the temperament of animals we live in proximity with. However, is there a Reading with Rover program at the local library, frequently there is but we hear little about it. Or is there a community based 4-H group who take their animals to Nursing Homes to share with the residents, again we hear little about it. The same is true on a national level when we look at all of the horrific news events. Such as, Sandy Hook School, we heard little about a group of owners and assisted therapy dogs who footed their own bill to help out with the suffering and loss of innocence for that community. The service dogs came from all over the U.S. some stayed for several months. (read article in petpartners.com/winter2014)

We need to reconnect with our working partners to create a better society. And we (the people) need to spend more time volunteering in our communities. Yes, we are busy and cash strapped, however there are things we can do. One short story about someone who made this their personal mission: ‘living in town with a Husky is a challenge for anyone. The dog has energy and intelligence which needs to be challenged so they can be a good pet. The owner recognized this right away and began two years prior to retirement training this dog to pick up objects around his yard and bring them to him. Upon retirement, our good neighbor started each day with a three mile walk and two garbage bags. He and the dog keep our streets clean for over five years, never asking for a penny or recognition.’