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Reality TV is the new money

Like orange is the new black, reality TV is the new money. Reality TV has birthed a new species of stars and has blurred the lines between film and television actors and reality TV “actors”.

Reality TV shows and stars-slide0
Photo by Isaac Brekken/Getty Images for Cirque du Solei
Kenya Moore, Cynthia Bailey, NeNe Leakes, Porshia Williams
Kenya Moore, Cynthia Bailey, NeNe Leakes, Porshia Williams
Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images

Reality Tv is a unique viewing experience. It is not based on finding individuals with talent per se; but is more of a “personality” driven programme focusing on public figures living in conditions created by the networks. For some stars, reality TV has relaunched their languishing careers and others it is the launching pad for stardom. Talk about art imitating life; perhaps life is imitating art.

This species of actors are masquerading as great talents, which critics say they unequivocally do not possess nor do they view reality TV as having the classy elements that Hollywood provides. Instead, reality stars are viewed as imposters.

Hollywood actors actually work on their craft, are subjected to multiple auditions and often rejected, while reality stars become instantly famous for doing nothing, in a manner of speaking.

Reality TV is so advantageous, it has created a new genre for the literary intelligentsia. One of the most popular editorial topics to write about today, is reality TV. Lamentably, it has had a profound affect on Hollywood. Networks can capitalize on hiring “non-actors” to do the job real actors do for far less and clean up economically.

There is no doubt that reality TV has provided these de facto celebrities transcendent visibility. Though many of these stars have aspirations of turning themselves into moguls, reality TV has always been the principal metier.

These days it appears reality TV has been the answer to our entertainment preoccupations. The intrigue stems from the scopophilia for the amazing lifestyles of the rich and infamous. More than that, there is an arcane desire to witness stars struggle with the same challenges normal people struggle with, making them analogous to the rest of us.

Reality TV has a bad reputation for being the instigator of gossip and is often accused of perpetuating violence, cutthroat behavior and poor stereotypes of women—particularly African American women. Major networks lure viewers in with high stakes, high energy sagas that promises cat fights, smack downs and verbal attacks over spilled tea.

What is often neglected from the debates about reality TV is the affect it has on society. Television is a powerful medium that helps shape our culture and reality TV is becoming part of that conundrum.