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R&B singer Akon is an icon at the Yucatan but not in the eyes of Buddhists

"Sexy Chick" music video- David Guetta ft. Akon copyright EMI

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    R&B singer Akon's new song "sexy chick " is a big hit at Findlay's most popular night club Yucatan.
    The people of Sri Lanka (on the other hand) are up in arms over the video for the singer’s song which features scantily clad women dancing in front of a statue of Buddha.
    In a country where 70 percent of its people are Buddhists, this was not exactly a great career move on Akon’s part.
    

 
 

The story first broke when Sri Lankans began joining the Facebook group called “We-Hate-Akon (abuse music video against lord Buddha).” The group became so popular that its membership grew from about 13,000 to over 16,000 within a week.
    Although the government was aware of the popular group they did not take it seriously until a large-scale protest damaged property outside of the offices of promoter Capital Maharaja.
    About 200 people carried signs, broke car windows and caused damage to the building’s exterior from the rocks they threw.
    Concerned with the violent messages on Facebook, the Sri Lankan government denied Akon the visa he requested in preparation for his April 24 concert. The singer tried to save his name by releasing a written statement to the public.
    “I was not aware that the statue was even on the set of the video until now,” Akon writes. “I would never set out to offend or desecrate anyone’s religion or religious beliefs.”
    The people of Sri Lanka are having a hard time believing that Akon or his agents in the American talent company did not think a giant statue of Buddha being surrounded by girls in bikinis would not offend anyone.
    Being no stranger to cultural faux pas, Akon also got in trouble in 2007 for inappropriate sexual behavior toward a 14-year old girl he danced with on stage at a club in Trinidad. Although the club has a policy banning minors from entering, the young lady managed to get in using her mature looks to convince staff that she was 19.
    The girl, a preacher’s daughter, was a fan of social networking, posting photos on Myspace of her provocative dancing with Akon. After getting a hold of the photos, the world slammed him for not having respect for women.
    Akon is originally from Senegal, whose club scene is dominated by a mix of Reggae and other Caribbean styles of music. Racy dancing is popular there, and some women love to be dominated by male dancing partners.
    Men swing the women through their legs, sliding them across the floor, shaping their bodies into spread-eagled positions. The women dress provocatively and are probably the inspiration for the women that Akon depicts in his songs and music videos.
    In countries like Sri Lanka, where a more modest dress for women is the norm, it is understandable why parents would not want Akon in their country.
    Cultural ideas based on what women should and should not wear—or what objects are sacred—do not always translate well from country to country.

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