Skip to main content

See also:

Quiz: 4 Fun Facts You Don't Know About Daylight Saving Time Starting March 9

Quiz: 4 Fun Facts You Don't Know About Daylight Saving Time Starting March 9

by Silicon Valley guide Michelle Carr-Crowe

It's time to spring forward at 2:00 am on Sunday, March 9, 2014, officially the start of Daylight Saving Time.

Fire marshals remind renters and homeowners that the beginning and end of Daylight Saving Time are good times to remember to test and replace batteries in your smoke detectors. Smoke detectors have an expiration life of 10 years, and units should be replaced each decade.

How much do you really know about DST? Test your knowledge to see how many of these 4 facts you know about Daylight Saving Time.

1. The American who first proposed a form of daylight saving time was:

a) George Washington

b) George Bush

c) Franklin D. Roosevelt

d) Benjamin Franklin

2. The first year of Daylight Saving Time was:

a) 1784

b) 1890

c) 1918

d) 2000

3. Which state most most recently adopted Daylight Saving Time?

a) Ohio

b) Arizona

c) Hawaii

d) Indiana

4. Which U.S. states do NOT observe Daylight Saving Time?

a) Alaska & Hawaii

b) Indiana & Hawaiii

c) Arizona & Hawaii

d) Arizona & Oklahoma

The first American to propose a form of daylight saving was Benjamin Franklin in 1784. Franklin noticed people burned candles late at night yet slept in past sunrise in the summer. Hence, Franklin’s famous quote: “Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise”.

The purpose of Daylight Saving Time was to increase energy efficiency by better utilizing the amount of sun (daylight) time when people are awake and productive. DST decreases the amount of sunlight in the morning and increases it in the evening. Studies have shown this reduces power usage, traffic accidents and crime.

DST was first used in 1918 and gained in popularity during World War I, when it was promoted as a method of conserving energy. However, there was no “standard” observation of DST.Cities, counties and states independently chose when and whether they wanted to change their clocks back and forth to accommodate DST.

The U.S. Congress passed the Uniform Time Act in 1966, which finally set the start and end dates of Standard Time. However, Daylight Saving Time did not become mandatory. Each state retained the power to choose to remain on Standard Time or Daylight Saving Time

Arizona and Hawaii are always on Standard Time. The most recent state to adopt Daylight Saving Time was Indiana in 2006.

Remember to set your clocks forward one hour at 2:00 a.m. on Sunday, March 9, 2014.

ANSWERS to the Quiz: 4 Fun Facts You Don't Know About Daylight Saving Time Starting March 9:

1) D Benjamin Franklin

2) C 1918

3) D Indiana

4) C Arizona & Hawaii

Thanks for reading this "Quiz: 4 Fun Facts You Don't Know About Daylight Saving Time Starting March 9".