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Progressive education has destroyed our school; writing alphabet makes young children expert readers

Catherine K. Flynn,
Founder, Principal, Teacher,The Glacier Waldorf School,
Kalispell, Montana
Catherine K. Flynn, Founder, Principal, Teacher,The Glacier Waldorf School, Kalispell, Montana
The Glacier Waldorf School

Comments

  • Jo-Anne Gross 5 years ago

    I think Steiner is showing us the googly goop that has destroyed the public school system in all English speaking nations!

  • MJ 5 years ago

    Steiner's comments sound too much like the "whole language' approach that left so many of our students unable to read - it hard to "love' reading when you have to struggle to read the words.

  • tim-10-ber 5 years ago

    The kids I know coming out of the lone Waldorf school in our community thrive in our top academic, generally private schools.

    Too bad the government schools have not stuck with the basics of a strong academic curriculum mixed with arts, music and pe for the past century. Just think where this country would be today if they had, but sadly no-o-o-o...

  • Kate Gladstone 5 years ago

    Catherine K. Flynn writes:
    "I believe I read somewhere that Einstein did not read until 11. He was too busy allowing his hugely imaginative, creative mind to fully develop."

    Despite the pleasing legends created by his publicists, Einstein began school at age 5 (after a year's home tutoring) and read fluently before age 7 (see sources below). Competence here, years before a proclaimed "ideal" age of 11, plainly left him as creative and intelligent as anyone who now declares him an example.

    Sources for Einstein's school career:

    /1/
    Rosenkranz, Ze’ev (2005), Albert Einstein – Derrière l’image, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, p. 29, ISBN 3-03823-182-7

    /2/
    Sowell, Thomas (2001), The Einstein Syndrome: Bright Children Who Talk Late, Basic Books, pp. 89–150, ISBN 0-465-08140-1

    /3/
    Dudley Herschbach, "Einstein as a Student," Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, page 3, web:
    chem.harvard.edu/herschbach/Einstein_Student.pdf

  • Bob Rose 5 years ago

    I hope your message gets through, but right now the only ones listening are the private schools, and then not all of them.

    Dick Kantenberger
    Gifted Education Writer
    Examiner.com

  • Kate Gladstone 5 years ago

    Research shows that the fastest and most legible handwriters avoid cursive. Highest-speed, highest-legibility handwriters join only some, not all, of the letters -- making the easiest joins, skipping the rest -- and tend to use print-like shapes for letters whose printed and cursive forms disagree.

    Kate Gladstone
    Director, World Handwriting Contest
    Founder, Handwriting Repair/Handwriting That Works
    Co-Designer, BETTER LETTERS handwriting improvement app for the iPhone, iPodTouch, and iPad

  • Mark 5 years ago

    MJ wrote, "Steiner's comments sound too much like the "whole language' approach that left so many of our students unable to read - it hard to 'love' reading when you have to struggle to read the words."

    As opposed to non-whole language approaches in use today that has produced results just as bad if not worse?

    Here's a thought: Stop experimenting on children with the next newest educational fad, and get back to teaching.

  • Dick Kantenberger 5 years ago

    Steiner's Waldorf method has been very successful throughout the world over the last 90 years with some 1000 schools, and a Waldorf education is rather expensive. I personally know a number of university professors who specialize in this field and believe that the Waldorf method is the model that public schools should emulate. They also like Montessori and most gifted and talented schools as well.

  • Bob Rose 1 year ago

    If you would like to have a three-page MS Word file attachment describing our unpublished on-line K-1 teacher study, please email me at rovarose@aol.com

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