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Pro bowlers not immune to lapses

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It even happens to the pros.

Los Angeles X bowler E.J. Tackett threw what seemed like a perfect strike ball during a Professional Bowlers Assn. League match against the New York City WTT KingPins.

The young right-hander’s shot hooked authoritatively into the pocket and shook up the pins – only to leave a ringing 10. Tackett, the PBA rookie of the year and in his first season with the X, then blasted his second shot toward the 10 pin – only to miss badly as the ball crashed into the gutter.

It’s a scenario that plays over and over with league bowlers. And it happens to the pros too.

The 21-year-old Tackett was very unlucky not to get a strike. But did he focus on his spare shot? Did his disappointment come out with a frustratingly thrown spare shot?

Tackett’s open took place in the ninth frame of a “Baker trios” game with the X comfortably ahead. The KingPins capitalized on that miss and went on to score a 14-pin victory. The KingPins’ victory later proved moot when the X defeated the KingPins in the team competition to claim the match.

But there was a lesson in Tackett’s blown shot: Don’t let the disappointment of a shot affect your next one.

It’s natural to feel let down after the pins don’t cooperate when one drives the ball exactly where one wants.

But it’s important to control one’s emotions and shake off the bad break.

It’s part of the psychology of bowling that often does not receive enough attention.

The good bowlers – especially the really good bowlers – know how to mentally forget about a bad break and concentrate on making that spare.

That’s why they’re good bowlers.

E.J. Tackett is better than a good bowler. Los Angeles X franchise player Jason Belmonte reportedly said that Tackett “had zero fear.”

But even a pro – even one as good as E.J. Tackett – can have a lapse in concentration.

Don’t let it happen to you!

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