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Preserve Maryland Opp, 11-Day field session public invited to get dirty hands

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In this season of archeological harvest, many Maryland historic preservationists would vote the choicest tomato to be the Tyler Bastian Annual Field Session. The event, which runs from Friday
through June 2, 2014 offers the public an opportunity to work alongside professional archeologists researching one the state's most significant sites.

Every year, the field session offers the public an opportunity to work alongside professional archeologists. For the second year, this year's field session - co-sponsored by the Maryland Historical Trust and the Archeological Society of Maryland - will be at the Biggs Ford site in Walkersville, Frederick County. The Biggs Ford site contains two villages dating to between AD 1000 and AD 1600 and offers many opportunities for both experienced and first-time students of archeology.

First investigated in the 1950s, the Biggs Ford site saw a major salvage effort in 1969-1970 when a planned sewer line was halted and state archeologists found hints of two villages from a partial circle of elongated pit features and patterns suggesting house structures.

Archeologists have uncovered two types of prehistoric ceramics, lithic tool-making materials and projectile points. Last year, the field session confirmed the existence of one village and found an intact Keyser pot, only the rim of which had been touched by the plow.

Yet, archeologists are confident there is more to find at the site.

No experience is necessary, although participants should read about access to the site, what to bring and what to expect by reading the field session fact sheet. Maryland Historical Trust staff will offer daily tool and excavation technique clinics. Fieldwork will run from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day

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