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Portsmouth Ohio's contribution to world-renowned publication of today

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For this edition, we go back in time, way back in time to the late 1880s, after the country had been divided over race. Though a regulation was issued against owning slaves, there were still some farmers who kept slaves, hiding them when the law would come poking around. Portsmouth, Ohio was no different though there were more free men than there were slave holders. Maybe it was because of the times in which he lived, our next person, though not labeled an author did edit, publish and help create some of the earliest books and publications for the progression of Negroes in America. His name is Augustus Granville Dill.

Augustus Granville Dill was born in November of 1881 in Portsmouth, Ohio. His parents, John Jackson and Elizabeth Stratton Dill, had one child already when he was born into their Court St. home. Dill grew into a fine young person, as told through different newspaper articles found on http://Ancestry.com, and after graduating from Portsmouth high school, Dill graduated from both Atlanta University and Harvard with B.A. degrees. After a brief teaching career in Portsmouth and at Atlanta University, he was enticed to move to New York to work with the professor he’d taken over teaching Sociology for, W.E.B. DuBois.

Augustus Granville Dill worked on major publications of the time including The Brownies', a magazine made for black children, as well as publish stories for the N.A.A.C.P. in a magazine titled The Crisis. Dill worked for the betterment of the Black race and is listed as a major contributor in the race labor relations by showing the disparities in hiring.

Troubled times found Dill and his mentor broke ties with him making him leave New York. Dill passed away in 1956 at the home of his sister in Louisville, KY.

http://lccn.loc.gov/22001351

The Brownies' book. New York, N.Y. : DuBois and Dill, 1920-1921. Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1920)-v. 2, no. 12 (Dec. 1921).2 v. : ill. ; 28 cm. AP230 .B7

*To see the newspaper articles you do need to be a member of ancestry.com. Sorry for any confusion.

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