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Planting the Standard of Democracy statue honors Newark World War I veterans

Planting the Standard of Democracy statue, at Lincoln Park, honors 20,863 Newarkers who fought in World War I.
Planting the Standard of Democracy statue, at Lincoln Park, honors 20,863 Newarkers who fought in World War I.
Lucy Santos

It is a bronze wonder containing figures that seem to be moving and a 75 foot flag pole in the middle of the statue, with the American flag, symbolic of American pride. Planting the Standard of Democracy statue is a work of art that was created so that future generations of Americans would never forget the 20,863 soldiers and mariners, from Newark, New Jersey, who fought in World War I. Charles Henry Niehaus, who was born on January 24, 1855 in Cincinnati Ohio to German parents, created the sculpture, “Planting the Standard of Democracy.” His iconic statues are found in many American cities.

On December 10th 1923, “Planting the Standard of Democracy” statue was dedicated in a touching and patriotic ceremony that 30,000 people attended at Lincoln Park. During the celebration, the attendees sang the Star Spangled Banner. The public paid $75,000 for the statue through a membership named the Victory Celebration Committee.

As we see the flag of this magnificent statue moved by a gentle breeze or a strong wind, we are reminded of the great sacrifices that our courageous World War I veterans made to keep democracy alive.