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Photos from NYC's Bi Book Club

NYC's Bi Book Club discusses Bi: Notes for a bisexual revolution
NYC's Bi Book Club discusses Bi: Notes for a bisexual revolution
Efrain John Gonzalez

The new book, "Bi: Notes for a bisexual revolution," by Shiri Eisner, has inspired a bisexual study group in NYC. Organized by BiRequest's Paul Nocera, the Bi Book Club had it's first meeting this month to examine and discuss the ideas of the author. None of us were strangers to discussing bisexual topics, since we all had been to BiRequest meetings, but working off a queer theory text was very intellectually stimulating. I had already been reading the book, when the idea for the study group came up, and I jumped at the chance to discuss it with others.

NYC's Bi Book Club group photo
Efrain John Gonzalez

Bisexual photographer Ephrain Gonzalez, who has two photography books to his credit, was on hand to document the proceedings, since he was also a study group member and never leaves the house without his camera.

Bi Notes, as a text, is very queer theory, very lefty and excruciatingly politically correct. I'm finding it very thought provoking... while also frequently annoying. Eisner definitely has many interesting ideas worth investigating. And her international perspective on the bi movement is refreshing, after a steady diet of books written in North America (Eisner currently lives in Israel, although she did live in the U.S. for a period of time.)

Sometimes Eisner makes generalizations about the bi movement, bisexual books and bi activists that are incorrect and states her opinions as if they were facts, backing them up with very little. Which seems odd, since her main ideas are so rigorously presented and she often quotes from other notable texts. However, even though I don't always agree with her ideas, they do make very worthwhile reading for anyone interested in bisexual or queer politics.

"Bi: Notes for a bisexual revolution" should be required reading for any queer theory class or LGBT studies program. It should be on any bi activist's reading list and on the shelf of anyone who collects bisexual books. It's an obvious title for any LGBT library or the LGBT section of any library or bookstore. If you are ready to tackle a book about bisexual politics, or have already read "Bi Any Other Name"; "Bisexual Politics: Theories, Queries & Visions"; "Bi America" or "Vice Versa" and are wondering what to read next, "Bi: Notes for a bisexual revolution" is the answer.