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Phoenix mayor Stanton Leads in Support of Mayors Climate Agreement

Phoenix mayor Stanton in middle
Phoenix mayor Stanton in middle
Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images

The mayor of Phoenix Greg Stanton once again took the lead with a small group of mayors in fighting against global warming. While at the US conference of mayors last weekend the mayor of Phoenix joined with other mayors including former Phoenix Sun’s player and now Mayor of Sacramento California Kevin Johnson in supporting this agreement. This agreement, known as the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement had already been initiated in 2005 but gained renewed support from this group of U.S. mayors . http://www.usmayors.org/climateprotection/agreement.htm

It’s important to note that this resolution only suggests steps in combating climate change and does not mandate anything. The suggestions are for natural solutions. For example, the renewed Agreement calls for developing local energy plans such as recycling water, encouraging traffic circles which some data has shown to reduce pollution public transportation and things like the more efficient construction of homes here and planting of more trees.

Yet, even though the U.S. Mayors Conference is split approximately down the middle with Democratic and Republican mayors, the support for this agreement is growing amongst the mayors who belong to this conference as seen from the growing number of mayors who now support it (1,060) http://usmayors.org/82ndAnnualMeeting/media/0623-release-climatechalleng... as compared to 2005 when it was initiated, (141).

Some history on this Climate Protection Agreement: On the same date that the Kyoto protocol was passed February 16, 2005 the mayor of Seattle Greg Nickels started this initiative (which became the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement) to advance the goals of the Kyoto protocol. This agreement declares that participating cities take three actions: try to have cities equal or beat the Kyoto protocol targets, urge their state governments and the federal government to follow the Kyoto protocol, and urge the U.S. Congress to come together and pass greenhouse reduction legislation that would start a national emission trading system. http://usmayors.org/82ndAnnualMeeting/