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Pets,Heat and Cars don't mix.

With summer in full force and the heat index rising above 90` a drive through town with your pet sounds fun, it fact it may be a death trap waiting to happen. On a 78` summer day the temperature in the vehicle can reach up to 120` in a matter of minutes, even with the windows cracked.
Recently in Maryland, an 11 year old  labrador named Max was mistakenly left in a car when the pets owner took Max along while she ran some errands. When she (the pet owner) returned home she forget Max was in the car and accidently locked him in the vehicle. She began finishing her chores in the house and heard a car honking in the drive. It was during her search as to where and why the car was honking, she discovered Max. The lab was sitting in the drivers seat honking the horn crying for help. Luckily, he survived with her quick thinking to cool him down and provided plenty of water. He was hot and exhausted, but other wise okay.
Animals cool themselves by panting and sweating through their paws. When the air they are breathing is hot, they cannot cool themselves down and may collapse from heat stroke. The best advice is to never leave your pet unattended in a car during winter or summer months. Many states have laws protecting pets from being left in parked cars. The Humane Society of Genesee County recommends reporting any incidents where you may see an animal left alone in a parked vehicle and in distressed. If you are unable to report the neglect, try finding the owner to let them know their pet seems to be in distress. The pet owner may not even realize they are putting their pet in danger.
Protect your pet from dangerous high heat during summer months; make sure they have plenty of fresh water and shade. For information on heat stroke and prevention, contact your veterinarian or the Humane Society of Genesee County

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