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Palm Trees in Boston Harbor Means Outdoor Art Season Has Begun

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When you look out into Boston Harbor and see palm trees coming up out of the water, you know it's a fantasy. Or, the artists of Boston are at work and it's spring.

Petyer Agoos's "Tropical Fort Point" is one of scores of outdoor public art and indoor art sponsored by the Fort Point Arts Community, Inc., which began its annual spring open studios last weekend and continues in some cases through the summer.

Agoos said "The struggle for quality public open space in the neighborhood and the likelihood of climate change-induced rising sea levels are the conceptual parents of Tropical Fort Point."

"I Wandered" by Kate Gilbert and Karen Shanley, at Harborwalk at Congress Street and multiple locations around Fort Point, i is a project that celebrates the arrival of spring and invites the public to explore the Fort Point through poetry. It will remain until June 8.

"Shimmer Shimmer" by Claudia Ravaschiere and Michael Moss uses the refractive qualities of translucent plexiglass fragments and wind driven kinetics to activate the Harbor Walk and engage the public viewing of the area along the Fort Point Channel. At Harborwalk at Summer Street and at the downtown side of Congress Street, it remains until June 8 also.

Fort Point artists are joining in the global Free Art Friday (FAF) movement. Anyone can join in whenever they like, to brighten up the streets.

"Nostalgia," which runs through July 6, is a group show exploring the theme of nostalgia and featuring works by 19 members of the Fort Point Arts Community. It includes photography, painting, drawing, video, digital collage, encaustic and mixed media constructions.

The Midway Cnahhel Gallery, Gallery 14, at 249 A Street, has opened "Stillness in Light and Landscapes," including photography, printmaking and sculptures.

The Grand Circle Gallery is exhibiting "Under Full Steam," showcasing vintage travel posters that explore travel by steamship from the late 19th Century through 1960. It runs through September 6.

Even the Boston Children's Museum is involved in the art project, with "Art for your Feet," along with Sneaker Museum, engaging children to re-imagine how thkey vew sneakers and art. It continues through July 6.

"e-inc. Environmental Film Festival" is the official Boston host of the Wild and Scenic Environmental Film Festival, the largest environmental film festival in the U.S., on Sunday, May 18.

The Forst Point Arts Community, Inc., of South Boston (FPAC) is a nonprofit community organization founded in 1980 and run by neighborhood artists and volunteers. Its mission is to promote the work of its artists to a broad and diverse audience, to preserve the artists community in the Fort Point Channel area, to insure the continuance of permanent, affordable studio space, to build community, and to increase the visibility of the arts in Fort Point. For more information on the art projects currently under way, go to info@fortpointarts.org.

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